Monday, December 23

Spoiled for choice

So which vegetables will we use for Christmas dinner? 


Although our Christmas dinner is unlikely to be of the traditional variety we will be eating traditional vegetables. Really this means the vegetables that we have available on our plot at the moment.

So should we choose Brussels sprouts?
For a year or two we seemed to have lost the knack of growing sprouts, then we started to grow a club-root resistant variety - Crispus and since then we've been back in business. As we are not members of the sprout detesting section of the population this is good news. We have been harvesting for a while but there are still plenty left.

Should we choose parsnips?
This year we have pulled some of our best ever parsnips. The variety is Gladiator. We've never had a parsnip like this before.

Should we choose carrots?
Some people maintain that you can't grow carrots on our allotment site - think again!

Should we choose leeks?
Should we choose a cabbage?
This year some of our Kilaton cabbages have grown huge - we'll never manage to eat a whole one at one sitting so maybe I'll have to freeze the excess. No Mark, I don't like sauerkraut.

If not a green cabbage should we choose red?
I really like braised red cabbage.

We have plenty of potatoes stored but which variety should we use?
If we don't fancy any of that, then there's always squash, onions and shallots in the greenhouse and peas and beans in the freezer.
Too much choice? But a good position to be in!

34 comments:

  1. Well that's a brilliant selection - and some whoppers too! My garden cannot compete with an allotment in terms of quantity. One of those parsnips would serve two people for a week!

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    1. There are advantages and disadvantages for both of us Mark. Ideally I'd want a large enough garden to have our allotment joined to our house.

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  2. A very good position to be in considering there's only parsnips available on my allotment now. I'm sending Hubby to harvest some tomorrow though, there's got to be parsnips on the Christmas dinner menu, and sprouts. Hubby's uncle has given me some sprouts he's grown, so they'll be home grown too. I've had to resort to buying carrots and broccoli (calabrese) though. If your Christmas dinner isn't going to be of the traditional variety, I'm wondering what you'll be eating.

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    1. We'll be having lamb not turkey, Jo and no Christmas pudding as we don't like it.

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    2. I love lamb. We're having turkey and beef and no Christmas pudding for us either, or Christmas cake or mince pies as we don't like any of them.

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  3. Wow what a great selection to choose from. That parsnip certainly lives up to it's name, it's a whopper!

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    1. We are wondering whether any others will be like this one, Julie or whether it is a fluke!

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  4. A great position to be in. For me it will be sprouts, as that's all I have left growing. But I shall go out and pick them on Christmas morning. What could be better than that?

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    1. Can't get fresher than that Jessica! Enjoy!

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  5. So envious, you've done so well. I'm determined to have some winter veg available next year. We always have sprouts and parsnips on Christmas Day, so I might give them a go. I'm taking note of your tip of choosing a club root resistant variety. I hope you enjoy your lunch, whichever things you choose. You have reminded me that I've got some broad beans in the freezer and some squashes in the garage, so I could get a little allotment-grown something onto the plate.

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    1. Choice is limited when it comes to club root resistance CJ but normal sprouts just won't grow. They start off fine and just fade away, Broccoli is the same but there doesn't appear to be a club root resistant variety.

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  6. Oh my goodness....what a range to choose from! Amazing harvest!!! I am jealous.xxx

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    1. I braised the red cabbage and we had some yesterday, Snowbird - only used half and I had loads including some to freeze.

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  7. Congratulation on growing such a crop! I envy you.

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  8. That's great harvest for 2013! Merry Chrismas & Happy New Year! May you have wonderful moment with your loved ones!

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  9. Egads! That is one heck of a parsnip. I always thought they were little. You should be so proud of your garden. Are all those growing now? My poor garden is under 3 feet of snow and it is a good thing, because it was -18 this morning. I'm so impressed with all of your potatoes. Thank you for the tour. It was inspiring. Merry Christmas.

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    1. All except the last two photos i.e. potatoes and the things in the last photo are growing now Bonnie -18 brrrrr ...

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  10. What a wonderful selection Sue. It's definitely sprouts, carrots and parsnip for me.

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    1. Two of those sprout sticks have been chopped of ready SG and we have carrots and parsnips at the ready. Red cabbage is braised too but we have already had some of that!

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  11. That's a good start for eating something home-grown every day! That parsnip is a monster!! Enjoy your Christmas veggies (and the rest of course)

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    1. It is Woody! Maybe we should have a veggie Christmas!

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  12. What a choice, it all looks good to eat, a great crop.
    Wishing you both a very Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year x

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  13. Rendered speechless looking at that gigantic parsnip!!!
    Oh wow I bet it will sell quickly if you have a stall next to a shopping mart with those best produces.

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    1. NO chance of finding out, Diana as we will eat the lot.

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  14. You could definitely eat well by just having vegetables on Christmas Day! I love Brussels sprouts and nothing beats honey roasted parsnips, a must for me at Christmas - sadly not home grown.
    Wishing you both a Merry Christmas and all the best for the New Year!

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    1. Maybe something veggie later, Helene. Best Wishes to you too

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  15. WOW. Now that is what I call impressive. Well done, you deserve it with all your hard work. I hope you enjoy your meal and thank you so much for your helpful and informative blog. I don't know how you find the time to write and post as well. Best wishes:)

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    1. Your very welcome Sweffling. Time wise it is called being retired.

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  16. Fabulous, who needs a supermarket!!

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    1. Just for the little extras. We have a good butcher and greengrocers locally but very rarely buy vegetables - pity we can'y grow oranges, bananas etc.

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  17. Blimey Sue that's quite an achievement with the veg. It's good to see hard work pay off.
    I grew Gladiator Parsnips the first year I was growing veg and they grow bloomin massive too. I then switched for some reason and didn't have the same success. After this years fiasco when wayne pulled all the seedlings up I'll be taking no chances next year and going back to Gladiator.
    I've never managed to grow a sprout in my life!
    your results certainly give me hope that I could achieve even a smidging of that amount if I put some real hard work in.
    A fresh new growing year is just around the corner :)

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