Thursday, December 19

Prim but not exactly proper

We have a lovely row of native primroses on the plot and I really wanted some to enjoy in the garden.
Last year when I was tidying up the ones growing on the plot I noticed some self sown seedling and so I potted these up to grow on a bit.
These sat in their pots over summer in a position where I would be sure to keep an eye on them and water them. They suffered a little bit of nibbling by what I presume were slugs and snails but they continued to grow.
I felt it was time they were planted out and so earmarked a patch of bare soil under a mahonia. It's in our spring border which is appropriate. I was a bit concerned that the soil may have been dry in that position but it was just fine and so now here they are.
I hope they like the spot chosen for them and provide a splash of creamy yellow in the spring.


24 comments:

  1. They should do well. There are loads here too and I frequently move them around. Once they get established and the leaves a bit tougher, nibbling seems to be less.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. The ones on the plot are good strong plants, Jessica and thrive.

      Delete
  2. Always nice to see these.

    ReplyDelete
  3. I love primroses, I always point them out to the boys wherever and whenever I see them. Can't help it.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. They take me back to childhood too CJ

      Delete
  4. I have never seen primeroses planted here. Look so nice. Is the plant could grow in the warm weather.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. They are spring flowers Endah and don't tend to like it when it is too warm.

      Delete
  5. I would like to have a huge bank of those on a South-facing slope. This would remind me of Cornwall, where wild Primroses used to grow in great profusion (and presumably still do).

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It's great to see them growing well isn't it, Mark?

      Delete
  6. I love primroses, you can't beat the beautiful native variety. They'll look great in the position you've put them.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I do agree, Jo. I like the cultivated ones but if I had to choose I'd choose the natives.

      Delete
  7. hey will look lovely when they flower, I have a few in my front garden.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I hope so, Jo - I guess they may not flower next spring until they settle in.

      Delete
  8. I adore our native primroses, I planted some here as one of the first things to do, and am looking forward to being able to increase them as they (hopefully!) bulk up and self seed around. Yours already look happy in their new home.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Good luck, Janet. Apparently to set seed successfully you need pin eyed and thrum eyed flowers. See this post on my blog

      Delete
  9. We have very few native primulas but there is a lovely one growing around here (primula mistassinica). Unfortunately it is minute. I have never tried to grow it in the garden as in nature they are directly on the limestone with not soil!
    I envy your native primulas. They survive in gardens here, but are not happy.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I Googled your primula Alain - very pretty. Alpine nurseries sell very similar ones here.

      Delete
  10. Hope they a;ll take well Sue, I really need to think about flowers for the bee plot....it will happen, hopefully sooner than later!!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. So do I Tanya. have you a list of wants for the bee plot?

      Delete
  11. I absolutely love primulas, how lovely to get so many free ones. They have come on nicely haven't they? You should have a lovely clump by spring.xxx

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I think I just started with about half a dozen, Snowbird ad the rest have been grown from seed they produced. The secret is to sow fresh seed..

      Delete
  12. Are they related to the seeds you sent me a couple of years ago? The ones you shared with me have grown into fantastic little plants, I'm sure yours will be beautiful when they are big enough to flower.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yes self sown from the same plants! Glad yours are doing well - hope you have a great display

      Delete

Thank you for visiting and leaving a comment - it is great to hear from you and know that there are people out there actually reading what I write! Come back soon.
(By the way any comments just to promote a commercial site, or any comments not directly linked to the theme of my blog, will be deleted)
I am getting quite a lot of spam. It isnot published and is just deleted. I have stopped sifting through it and just delete any that ends up in my spam folder in one go so I am sorry if one of your messages is deleted accidentally.
Comments to posts over five days old are all moderated.