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Tuesday, December 10

Can't completely avoid those prickly plants

I mentioned in an earlier post that one of our plot renovation projects had the added bonus of me not having to become entangled in the bramble as there would be no need of an annual prune.

This doesn't mean I was be able to avoid prickly pruning altogether.

We have five shrub roses in a bed on the edge of the plot. The bed is another area earmarked for renovation. You can see why from the photos below.

The top two  photos are prior to pruning and the bottom two after pruning. 

I'd be surprised if you could spot the roses amidst all the rubbishy growth. I also cut back the Sambucus Nigra which had growth really tall - much easier to spot the difference there. No doubt they will repay me by refusing to produce flowers next year.
Around February/March time the roses will be given their final prune. No doubt this will mean more thorns trying to defend the plant by penetrating glove and skin!

By then we are hoping this bed will look much tidier - well that's the plan anyway.



20 comments:

  1. You're going to have a very posh plot next year with all the work you're putting in.

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    1. The honeyberry bed was sorted today, Jo but more on that later. Martyn may mention it tomorrow.

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  2. How big is your plot Sue? It looks huge!

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    1. It's the equivalent of 5 standard allotment plots Jessica which I think amounts to a third of an acre. Ours is an open plan site with no fences so it may well be that in the photo it's difficult to determine where our plot ends.

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  3. It's good that you can get out at this time of year to do these jobs and I'm sure you will be rewarded with beautiful blossoms next year.

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  4. Well done you, make sure you use the extra thick gloves! How lovely to have so many roses at the allotment. I've got one, and another to put in. They do make such nice cut flowers.

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    1. The only problem is they get blackspot badly, CJ and I think two of them may be on the way out - the hard pruning is a last attempt to save them

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  5. Ouch to any kind of pruning I say! I had to fight through some gorse bush yesterday to get to a tree I wanted to cut some greenery from - blinkin gorse and those spines! My legs have holes where the spines pricked my skin and some of them are black. I so hate gorse bush!
    Your Roses are going to look lovely next year though.

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    1. I guess that's why gorse is so popular with nesting birds. Linda.

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  6. I've just spent the last hour trying to get a tiny piece of rose thorn from one of my fingers (I can't wear gloves when gardening, it doesn't feel right) doing a similar job. Well done on getting the job done Sue!

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    1. I know what you mean Angie I had tiny pieces of thorn that played hide and seek when I was trying to remove them. Lots of sucking and squeezing.

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  7. Well, I reckon your roses got off quite lightly. You should see what happens when I get in to pruning mode. Last year I did the roses in my daughter's property in France. I gave them a very severe cut, and they responded very well. Fiona says they were brilliant this Summer!

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    1. That's only their temporary trim, mark in February I shall be more severe!

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  8. I tend to underestimate thorns when I start pruning roses but I am quickly reminded that I delude myself thinking thorns are not such a big deal. Here there areas (ditches) where brambles are out of control. They become impenetrable thickets.

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    1. I have admiration for animals like goats and deer that manage to munch them, Alain

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  9. Shrub of roses on the plot, hmm... sounds a great idea. Maybe I have to try this.

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    1. II don'y know if this stil happens but in the wine growing area of France I've seen roses at the end of rows of vines, Endah.

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  10. I have lots of plans Sue...hope yours are quicker than mine to materialise!!

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    1. Three tasks completed Tanya - more on the list. It is easier when two people are involved though.

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