Monday, December 6

Would you eat beyond rotten fruit?

We bought a medlar tree about three years or so ago and planted it in the garden. Must admit that we liked the sound of it as an ornamental tree rather than as a fruit supply.
It flowers in May/June and has large shiny leaves.
It has good autumn colour ...
and interesting fruits.

The tree is still only very small but has produced a few fruits each year. Before the fruits can be eaten they have to blet. Bletting is a polite way of saying that the fruit has to go beyond ripe and have started to decay and ferment. Doesn't that sound appetising? It doesn't look very appealing either.
Last year after bletting we made apple and medlar jelly.
Although this tasted quite nice we don't really eat much jelly or jam so this year as the fruits were larger we decided to try eating them raw.

According to what I have read and as seen on TV, (apparently medlars are one of the old-fashioned fruits making a come-back so we are inadvertent trend-setters), once the fruit is bletted the flesh can be spooned out to eat. It is supposed to taste of dry applesauce with a hint of cinnamon. I decided that would probably taste quite good in yoghurt. On breaking it apart the inside of the fruit looked a bit like bread.
Thankfully Martyn and I tried a taster first and agreed that it wouldn't be going into the yoghurt. Maybe it's an acquired taste but we didn't like it - it tasted more yeasty than cinnamony no doubt the product of fermentation.

I know I picked them a little early as they should be left until after the first frost - but I forgot that - and maybe I left them to blet for too long - but we won't be eating any this year. Next year we'll try again - perhaps.

If you want to read more about our medlar and how we made the apple and medlar jelly then visit this page of my website

26 comments:

  1. I don't fancy those much, maybe that's why they went out of fashion. Not quite the convenience of an apple or pear. Hope they taste better next year.

    ReplyDelete
  2. Enjoyed your informative (as ever)post. We have high hopes of our Mulberry bush if it survives the winter. Now glad we didn't pump for the medlar first!

    ReplyDelete
  3. I have never tried them. But some people really like them. From what I have seen, they eat them before they rot, but before they get nice brown color and become soft.

    ReplyDelete
  4. I hope they taste better too Damo but there again it is a good looking tree.

    I have wondered about mulberries so will be interested to see what it is like - they can grow quite tall can't they? Wakefeild prison has a Mulberry bush in the middle of the exercise yard which apparently was the origin of "Here we go round the mulberry tree" The female prisoners used to walk round it when exercising.

    See here

    Hi vrtlarica - maybe I haven't got the technique of bletting mastered yet. I did leave them longer this year than last so maybe they over bletted.

    ReplyDelete
  5. I've never heard of them being eaten raw before, just made into jams, jellies and pies. Have you read Dawn's recent posts on medlars - http://raisingseedlings.blogspot.com/
    She wrote a post about the medlar tart she had made, that's something you could try.

    ReplyDelete
  6. Hi Jo,
    I'd never been to that blog before and she seems to love medlars doesn't she? From what I have read I think they suffer from the Marmite syndrome. I haven't enough for a tart this year but will certainly have a go at that another time.

    ReplyDelete
  7. I'd definitely stick to the jelly. There's a gorgeous huge mulberry tree (NOT bush!) in the grounds of Wilberforce House, a museum in Willwiam Wilberforce's old house in Hull. It's got lots of exchibits on the slave trade, which he was instrumental in abolishing. The tree is in the garden and it always seems such a shame to see the fruit falling to the ground to be ruined.

    ReplyDelete
  8. That is an interesting fruit. I have to be adventerous enough to eat it.

    ReplyDelete
  9. It's always a shame to let fruit spoil VH - maybe the wildlife eats it.

    ReplyDelete
  10. Hi Diana,
    It's certainly different

    ReplyDelete
  11. ummmm, you pose an interesting question. Generally my answer would be "no, are you bonkers!" and in the this case maybe I would be sensible in staying away (you didn't exactly make them sound delightful). BUT, if I had grown them myself...of course I would give it a go, reluctantly maybe but darn it - I GREW IT!
    Oh I'm all impassioned now *blush*

    ReplyDelete
  12. I did give it a go Carrie and only made it sound awful having tasted it but they really did taste Yuk! I must have done something wrong as some people seem to like them - I'll be giving it another go next year too.

    ReplyDelete
  13. how facinating! I've never heard of the fruit or bletting. Too bad you didn't like it but it makes for a great story!

    ReplyDelete
  14. I'm not totally giving up on them yet Steve just for this year!

    ReplyDelete
  15. I've heard of meddlars but I don't think I've ever actually seen a tree. After your graphic description I don't think I'll be rushing out to buy one. As for mulberries, the trees grow very large, and quite quickly; I think they have a beautiful shape though wide and spreading. Being caught 'red handed' comes from the fact that you can't pick the fruit without getting stained hands. Chrisitna

    ReplyDelete
  16. Welcome Christina
    Maybe wide and spreading wouldn't fit in our garden.

    Hope that I haven't put you off medlrs too much - the tree is lovely and medlar jelly is nice to eat - it's just the raw ones and I'm sure it must be me and not the medlar. I'll be ending up sued for being medlarist

    ReplyDelete
  17. It looks like you opened a br4ead roll. I don't know that I would want to grow one of these trees but I would certainly try the fruit...even if it was only the once!!

    ReplyDelete
  18. In my case Tanya I'll try again - It does look like a bread roll dosen't it

    ReplyDelete
  19. Hi Share my blog and thank you for posting a comment. I can tell from your blog that you are very visual some gorgeous snow photos!

    ReplyDelete
  20. They do sound fascinating. Sort of Tudor/Old English-y. Perhaps they ate them in those days with lots of spices to disguise the taste.

    ReplyDelete
  21. Apparently they were popular in the Middle ages Linda

    ReplyDelete
  22. I'd heard of medlars and was very curious about them.

    It's great to see pictures and get information about them from 'real' people.

    Maybe one day I'll give one a try - but I'm not much of a jam person myself, so it could be a risk if I'm as fond of them as you have been this year!

    ReplyDelete
  23. Hi Jay,
    I have had a quick look at your 'Medieval' video so medlars should be just the fruit for you!!

    I'll update next year on how we get on again especially if I try the tart idea that Jo suggested.

    ReplyDelete
  24. I didn't knew this plant. It looks very interesting. I am intrigued by the taste. I would like to try it

    ReplyDelete
  25. Pity that you are so far away Fer or you could have one of mine but it would be well and truly rotten if it had to make its way all the way to you!

    ReplyDelete

Thank you for visiting and leaving a comment - it is great to hear from you and know that there are people out there actually reading what I write! Come back soon.
(By the way any comments just to promote a commercial site, or any comments not directly linked to the theme of my blog, will be deleted)
I am getting quite a lot of spam. It isnot published and is just deleted. I have stopped sifting through it and just delete any that ends up in my spam folder in one go so I am sorry if one of your messages is deleted accidentally.
Comments to posts over five days old are all moderated.