Friday, May 4

At least some things don't seem to mind this awful weather!

As there is not much happening on the vegetable front, other than seed sowing and waiting, I thought I'd cheer myself up by posting about progress on the flowering garden front.

The perennials that I planted last year in front of the house are really shooting along. I'm planning to add a few annuals into any gaps in the planting but at this rate maybe I won't have any gaps!
The mini daffodils - Pipit - at the back of the photo have been flowering for ages. Although they are beginning to look a bit ragged now, it seems that they have enjoyed the cooler (no let's not understate this  - cold) conditions.



I had planted few heuchera - Plum Pudding  temporarily on the plot. A couple were split up and planted as edging plants and have really taken off. It's surprising how easy it is to grow heucheras. Even a bit that has hardly any root seem to grow. I suppose this is the reason whyI usually end up with too many for the garden.


Also on the plot I found three self seeded verbena bonariensis. These were dug up and kept in pots in the greenhouse over winter and have been planted in gaps - they can't be seen in the photo yet so you will have to take my word for it, that they are growing well.









The geraniums that I planted last year have made really good growth and are beginning to produce flowers.
But the star of the flower bed at the moment has to be the aquilegias that I grew from seed last year. Not all of them are flowering yet but the ones that are look beautiful.
Footnote:
Diana at Kebun Malay-Kadazan Girls has just found out that another blog is stealing all her posts. This blog is posting Diana's work as if it is their own! If you have a blog then it is worth reading the post in which Diana has described her experiences.


27 comments:

  1. It's looking great. I particularly like the yellow aquilegias.

    ReplyDelete
  2. I found you from your comment on slow Growing in Scotland. When I lived in England I was on a waiting list for an allotment but never made it to the top of the list. Now I can live that part of my dream by reading your blog. I garden in Calgary, Canada. We have community gardens, I'll try to send some info and pictures. I can't believe how many garden bloggers have Susan as a name. Is it an age thing? Susan Hayward was a popular movie star when I was born.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I don't know why I was named Susan and I can't ask as I don't have either parent living. I do know that there were five Susans in my year at high school. Of course we may be different generations, I could be a lot older than you!

      Anyway glad you stopped by and posted a comment.

      Delete
  3. I really like the dark purple geranium, there are lots of these growing in Pleasington nature reserve. Id love to know how to propagate them if you have any ideas Sue?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I know that you can divide them Cpt. You are also supposed to be able to grow from seed in early spring although I don't know whether they will have cross pollinated or will come true from collected seed. Trying to decide when the hellebore seed will be ready to collect for you!

      Delete
  4. Hi Sue.

    I just thought I'd ask you if you don't mind...

    I want to add some plants to our allotment to add a bit of colour. I don't mind if they are edible or not, but I quite like the idea of hardy perrenials so I only have to plant them once and I don't need to give them much care (after all, I'm not a massive flower person). Can you reccomend any plants/flowers/shrubs/bushes I could grow.

    Thanks,

    Martin

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. The only problem with growing perennials on the plot is you have to keep up with the weeding. The temptation is to just let them get on with it. WE have a patch where we have done this that needs digging out!

      Of course it will depend on your soil and position (sun/shade etc) We have a border of shrub roses - but you will need to prune them a bit. You could go for fruit too and herbs but these may not be colourful enough for you.

      If you want to grow flowering plants - I'd go for ones that the bees will love to visit so here goes with some.:
      lavender, sedum spectabile, campanula, cornflower (centarea), asters (choose mildew resistant varieties), phlox, penstemon, geranium (cranesbill), rudbeckia (perennials varieties), achillea (easy from seed), perennial wallflower (erysimum, lupin, liatris, Japanese anemone, heuchera (colourful leaves) foxgloves (not perennial but self seed - maybe too much, Leucanthemum (shasta daisy), geum, potentilla, scabious, heathers and then spring bulbs

      You would need to check whether the soil condition etc were OK for instance some prefer an alkaline soil. Try to inlcude different shaped flowers to to accommodate different bees.

      Delete
    2. AnonymousMay 11, 2012

      Thanks Sue, have written these down and will be doing some more research.
      Thankyou!

      Martin

      Delete
    3. Look forward to seeing how you do Martin

      Delete
  5. Just beautiful. A truly cheerful sight, especially after a long or wet winter. :)

    ReplyDelete
  6. I particularly like the Hardy Geraniums. I used to have quite a collection of them, but got rid of them in favour of the Dogwoods - mainly because I found the Geraniums to be high maintenance plants. It's not easy to keep them looking neat.
    Real Bank Holiday weekend weather here today. I had hoped to plant out some seedlings, but it's far too cold.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I think one secret with geraniums, Mark is to cut them back after they flower and look straggly and they seem to have a second wind!

      Delete
  7. The flowers are looking lovely Sue...glad your garden is enjoying the weather even if we aren't!!

    Will check out the post from Diana...thanks for the heads up on this.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. If only we could get out there more Tanya

      Delete
  8. Geraniums are great plants. Your border is coming along nicely. I'll have to check my aquilegia tomorrow and see if they are flowering as much as yours! Shame about Diana's website; she has an amazing site and she should get all the credit for it.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It is a shame - why have a blog if you want to use other epople's writing - especailly using the photos of her children!

      Not all of my aquilegias are flowering as much as that one even though they aren't far apart

      Delete
  9. I do like aquilegias - fascinating slightly surreal shape. My daughter would love that shade of pink.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. You can see why they are also callet Granny's Bonnets can't you Liz

      Delete
  10. It's looking great. I particularly like the yellow aquilegias.

    Garden centre Staffordshire

    ReplyDelete
  11. Another vote for yellow GC - I wonder what colours the other ones will be.

    ReplyDelete
  12. I don't know about preferring subtlety, Sue. I do love bright, zingy colours, but I've got a real soft spot for yellows too.

    ReplyDelete
  13. Impressed with how advanced some things are compared to over here. Aquilegias and geum look lovely, mine are nowhere near flowering.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. We have some aquliegias just in bud too BW

      Delete
  14. Thanks Sue keep looking at mine too, will have to have a search round on the net to see the optimum time

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I've had a look and it says to gather seeds when the seed pods just start to split and then sow asap I have plenty of seed pods but they haven't started to split so I guess it will all be in the timing! Can you send me your address so I can post the seeds out quickly after gathering. Email is on the sidebar.

      I did notice lots of baby plants amongst the big ones. It will be interesting to see what sort of flowers result as there is bound to be some cross pollination. Looking at the babies we may be in for a long wait for them to flower!

      Delete

Thank you for visiting and leaving a comment - it is great to hear from you and know that there are people out there actually reading what I write! Come back soon.
(By the way any comments just to promote a commercial site, or any comments not directly linked to the theme of my blog, will be deleted)
I am getting quite a lot of spam. It isnot published and is just deleted. I have stopped sifting through it and just delete any that ends up in my spam folder in one go so I am sorry if one of your messages is deleted accidentally.
Comments to posts over five days old are all moderated.