Friday, March 15

Our annual visitors blow in

When I went out into the garden the other night, I heard a strange sound that, at first, I didn't recognise. Martyn came out to listen and he just said, "They're back then."

Of course, the sound that I had heard was the frog chorus, although it would be more accurately described as a frog solo as the voice belonged to a solitary frog.

The next morning I went out, camera at the ready, to try to spot our visitor. Unless their attentions are busy with other more demanding activities, the frogs in our pond are ever watchful, and dive under the surface if a camera is pointed in their direction.

As it happens we spotted at least three frogs, and they had already been very busy.
A huge pile of frog spawn was nestled in amongst the watercress and, as we have noticed every year, the frogs appeared to be protecting it.
In previous years we have observed several frogs arranged around the spawn, all facing in different directions staring defiantly whenever we approached. It's another occasion when they don't automatically plop below the surface.


Despite the presence of ever hungry fish, some of the plentiful spawn will survive and return as frogs the following year.

This year the frog arrival is a couple of weeks earlier than last year, maybe they made good progress courtesy of the strong winds that have coincided with their arrival. I'm sure those large webbed feet would make excellent sails. There that's something to look out for in the future - flying frogs?

Copyright: Original post from Our Plot at Green Lane Allotments http://glallotments.blogspot.co.uk/ author S Garrett

14 comments:

  1. Ooh! How exciting! Can't wait to see whether ours have flown in yet!! :-D

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    1. I’m sure that they are on their way, Belinda.

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  2. Thanks for the alert. Webbed fingers crossed.

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  3. Great pictures!
    Spotted spawn in my pond just now

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    1. Thanks, Roger. Always good to see lots of spawn.

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  4. Wow - that is a LOT of spawn!

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    1. Sadly only a tiny percentage of spawn reaches adulthood, Margaret so i guess they need to deliver lots of spawn just to end up with a couple of mature frogs.

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  5. Lovely photos. It's very froggy in our pond, I think there really aren't enough ponds around - everyone should have one! Our frogs are shyer than yours though, I would struggle to get a photo of them. Maybe we are noisier than you...

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    1. Ours tend to be preoccupied at the moment CJ.

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  6. The sounds of spring Sue, the songs of frogs. It's lucky that your pond didn't freeze but mine did and the frogs die under the ice.

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  7. That's brilliant news, Sue! Great images too. Well jealous here, have been regularly checking our pond in the evenings and have seen one frog but alas it's either hiding or moved on to the call from another pond (although sadly there aren't many in my area that I know of). I'm ever optimistic though - maybe this weekend ;-)

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    1. I hope the frogs head your way, Shirley

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