Monday, November 5

You just never can tell.

As far as roots crops are concerned you never can tell what has been happening below ground until you take the fork and full of anticipation lever up the soil.

The feeling of anticipation is then replaced by either delight or disappointment and as usual this year we have experienced both emotions. Fortunately there has been more delight than disappointment.

The carrots this year have done well - last year they were a disaster. The beetroot too has done well - it's only produced small roots but really that is what we want. We picked our first parsnips and although it is early days it seems that we will be harvesting a useful crop.
We have also been pleased with out potato harvest. Conditions as they were we weren't expecting too much but in the end we have a similar crop to what we have achieved in other years. Martyn summarised our potato harvest here.

So on to the disappointment - we have tried in the past to grow celeriac with no success and this year has proved to be no exception. We have tried our utmost to follow the rules - plant early - water well (the weather has taken care of the watering). So why have we ended up with this?
Maybe if you didn't notice the £1 coin, you could be forgiven for thinking it didn't look TOO bad. Or maybe you noticed it shame-faced hiding in alongside the carrots above. Don't laugh Mal! So what is your secret to success - is it the Scottish air. Maybe we should bag some and bring some back when we pop across the border next month! I know it's not a root crop but the celery is rubbish as well!

So far the score is 4-1. Will the final score be 5-1 when the swede is lifted later or will it be another disappointment and a final score of 4-2?

PS: I notice from my survey here that one or two visitors have put that they don't make comments on posts as everyone who does comment seems to know one another. In most cases we only 'know' one another through visiting and commenting on one another's blogs and ALL bloggers love to have comments from new people as well as our regular visitors so please don't be shy about joining in - you will be most welcome and if you have a blog I can visit you too!

Copyright: Original post from Our Plot at Green Lane Allotments http://glallotments.blogspot.co.uk/ author by S Garrett

22 comments:

  1. I'm trying celeriac for the first time this year, i have no idea what I'm doing but I suspect trial and error will be the way to go anyway. The rest looks fabulous!

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    1. We tried growing it a few times, Liz and this time did everything 'by the book' - so far never any success. Don't really know what we could do differently. I'd blame the weather but Mal in Scotland has grown some roots.

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  2. I would have thought that the celeriac would do well in the wet summer we've had, shows what I know. The rest of it looks great though. I've ended up with three parsnips from multiple sowings so I hope they're doing well under ground.

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    1. We thought they'd love the wet conditions too, Jo. Maybe they want warm and wet!

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  3. Yes, I have decided that Celeriac is too much like hard work! My best efforts were about the size of a tennis-ball. With the Swedes, surely you can see how they are doing even before you lift them - most of the "root" is above ground, isn't it?

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    1. You're right about swede, Mark but ours were a bit late in so no swollen stems at the moment. It's just a matter of whether they'll make enough grown before they decide to stop.

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  4. I only have 3 carrots this year and I haven't dug them up yet. I will be having a look at my roots this weekend weather permitting!!

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    1. They'll be a delicacy then Tanya.

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    2. Depending what has happened beneath the earth!!

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  5. Thank you. You made me feel better. My carrots were a disaster last year also and I thought it was me. This year I had nice carrots, but it makes me feel better knowing I'm not the only one with crop failure.

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    1. BBB&B Every year you can guarantee that you'll have at least one disaster. This year for us it was squash, pumpkins, onions and maybe other things that haven't yet come to mind unless you count celery and celeriac that we have never yet mastered. OH sweet peppers, aubergine and tomatoes very late to ripen too!

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    2. Forgot to mention pears and cherries.

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  6. I am going to grow carrots... it doesn't matter if it comes out small and tiny in our hot weather!... Have a nice day.

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    1. Small ones taste just as good Bangchik sometimes better.

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  7. Love it, great blog

    I saw you on garden gab. I'm garden tips, please pop by for look at my blog
    http://plottips.blogspot.co.uk/

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    1. Thanks GT - I will pop over for a visit

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  8. Your celeriac looked good until I saw the coin you pointed out. I didn't grow celeriac this year as I found it 'awkward' to grow (getting a good size and cleaning it is a bit difficult). Did you eat celeriac leaves? I used to put some in stews.

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    1. No we didn't eat any part of it, Kelli. Most is still in the ground. The celery was an equal failure.

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  9. Hi, I read your blog quite often and I thought I'd comment on the celeriac. I normally have a good crop of celeriac but this year they aren't quite as good. However, I did plant a few spare plants in my polytunnel this year and made sure I watered them well and they are much bigger than the plants outside. Therefore I think, as well as lots of water, they need warmth too, which we were short of this year.

    Hope this helps

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    1. Hi Not just GF - great to hear from you - sorry about the repeat message on your blog - a case of not having the brain in gear. I did wonder if the lack of warmth could have affected the celeriac - maybe we need to try again and hope next year is better!

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  10. Sue, Just catching up. There's got to be something the commercial celeriac growers are keeping to themselves! Mine were better shaped this year but so small as to be eaten in one pot (winter casserole of vegetables). Given my stubbornness I'm going to give them yet another go next year, maybe in a raised bed at home where I can see them - and feel defeated everyday!

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    1. They do seem very reluctant to grow, Mal.

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