Monday, September 17

Homecoming Harvest

Our first visit to the plot after our week's neglect showed that for the most part the plot did OK without us. The wind had battered some plants. Probably the worst affect was one of our cardoons - although the other was still standing proud.
Each year these plants are flattened - amazingly they die down completely over winter and then grow enormous again. It's amazing to think that we grew them from small seeds. Apparently you can eat the stems but we grow them as the bees love them. The sweetcorn also took a buffeting and many plants had developed a lean - soon we'll have to test the cobs.
The bees and butterflies are still enjoying the dahlias maybe because there is still not sign of a pompom  they can access the pollen easily. As I was dead heading there was buzzing and fluttering all around me.
There was plenty of fruit to pick including some lovely strawberries. Quite a few were spoiled by slugs. The new beds without the weed control fabric seemed to have suffered most. As I was picking fruit a frog hopped out from under the plants in the larger bed so maybe it had been doing a good job for us whilst fattening up for it's winter sleep.
A highlight was the picking and more importantly eating of the first of this year's peaches. Quite a few rotted on the tree but we still have a few more to look forward to. Martyn posted photos on his blog here.
There was also quite a lot of choice of vegetables ready and waiting to be gathered in.
Taking this photo reminded me off setting out the harvest festival displays when I was teaching although these celebrations always seemed to come too long after the real harvest.
The plot greenhouse is now producing lots of tomatoes but the garden greenhouse tomatoes are resolutely staying green.
We were amazed by the size of one of our cucumbers.
One plant that is definitely showing signs that the seasons are moving on is the blueberry which is now displaying full autumn colour.
As well as there being lots to harvest now there are also lots of things progressing well that should give us harvests later in the year. The album below gives almost a full plot roundup - although for some reason I forgot to take a photo of the carrots!



I don't usually take part in this sort of thing (are they memes?). I just find it difficult to establish the sort of disciplined routine that other bloggers manage but this week it seemed appropriate to add this post to the Harvest Monday theme on Daphne's Dandelions

29 comments:

  1. Well it looks like you are harvesting plenty now...I am very envious of those tomatoes...I am hoping for a more productive year next year with everything...I am still doubtful as to whether I will get any sweetcorn before it's time to pull the plants up. :-(

    Checked out your September album. Those peaches look delicious and your apples look great too. My apples haven't gotten any bigger than golf ball size...thinking I will try pruning the trees this year.

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    1. I think apples have been a problem for even commercial growers this year Tanya. Ours are small but not as small as yours and many have damaged skins - what's strange is the wasps don't seem to have found them yet this year which is usually a problem.

      We need to check on our sweetcorn - last year we didn't get a single cob.

      By the way - any pompoms yet? My supplier was a bit indignant saying of all the thousands of packets sent out I was the only one to mention the problem. I thought I was doing them a favour alerting them to it - I thought they could question there supplier - can't win can you?

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    2. definitely no pompoms and the flowers are now not looking their best so i don't hold out any hope. I did check though and we do have a few different colour although ours seem to be mainly within the 'reds' colouring!

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    3. So we really needed half a packet of each - each, Tanya

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    4. lol....I still don't think I would keep my fingers crossed...we would probably split the seed the wrong way and only end up with one colour each!!

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  2. What a great harvest. Isn't it funny how the tomatoes are ripening at the plot but not at home? It's been a strange year all round.

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    1. It certainly has been a strange one, Jo

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  3. I love the Harvest Festival photo - what a great display! It looks as if you are now getting a good crop of ripe tomatoes, despite their late development.

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    1. Making up for lost time Mark - I've been freezing tomatoes today!

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  4. WOW! That's one amazing harvest you got there!

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  5. I agree with Jenny - such a lot of produce (trouble is - now you've got to do something with it all) - I can foresee hours standing in the kitchen!

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    1. Some freezing, compoting and pickling done yesterday, Elaine. We found that last year the apples kept well in an old fridge in the garage.

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  6. What a GREAT harvest. I love your pictures. Thanks for joining us this week. We are glad you are here. :)

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  7. What a great harvest Sue...I too love the photos. Wonder why the tomatoes in the greenhouse are remaining green? Is it possible, they need a bit of cold weather to ripen..a scare to tell them to mature their seeds?

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    1. All I can think of is that it is warmer in the smaller greenhouse, Bren - other than that it is a mystery!

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  8. What an amazing bounty.

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  9. Great harvest, you've done well this year, taking into account the weather! So glad most of your tomatoes are ripening - I've given up the ghost with some of mine and am making green tomato chutney!

    Simon @Ambius

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    1. It's certainly been a green tomato year Simon

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  10. What a fantastic harvest, something I can aspire to. Really impressed by all those tomatoes too. And the fruit looks delicious.

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  11. That's really a successful harvest!
    That's really long cucumber! ;)

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    1. The long cucumber is now no more Malar - all eaten.

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  12. My kids will be very happy in your allotment rather than our small garden here. Oh...sweet corn miss them, have not grown them for a year now. So many nice goodies!You have plenty of dahlia to cut and bring indoors.Are you going to collect the dahlia tuber this year?
    Tomato tomato tomato so so so nice.

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    1. I'll grow dahlias from seed again Diana - this time they will be a variety that is supposed to be single - this way I won't be disappointed and the bees will get a treat.

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  13. That's an outstanding harvest and testament to the hard work you both put in all year.

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