Monday, May 25

At the risk of being boring

At first I thought that I couldn't possibly bore you by writing about rhubarb again. Then I reconsidered as we aren't harvesting much else at the moment and you can always kill the page.

So at the risk of becoming boring here is our latest rhubarb harvest.
It isn't all destined to be eaten this week, after all that would be asking for trouble, most will be stewed and frozen.

For those of you that have read previous posts - can you guess which variety this is? A clue is that it is a variety that we have picked earlier.

We do have lots of rhubarb some varieties not yet harvested so be prepared to be bored again. The two photos below are different clumps,
If you look closely at the photo above on the right you may be able to tell that the two varieties of rhubarb have different leaf shapes. Here's a closer look.
On the right Grooveless Crimson has smoother edged leaves which are narrower than Timperley Early on the left.

Our other main harvest was purely decorative. Last year we grew Sweet Rocket for the first time. It was a  purple variety.
This year I thought I'd like a mix of colours so bought a mixed packet and ended up with this.
The photo is a bit deceptive as the flowers are mostly white. Maybe I need to buy a packet of each colour next year. Does anyone know how long the seed stays viable and whether seed collected from the flowers comes true to the colour of the parent plant?

The flowers don't last long  when cut - although maybe I should cut them when the flowers are mostly in bud - but their perfume can rival most other cut flowers. It seems at its most intense in the evening.
We have also harvested peas shoots and salad leaves but these are just picked and eaten straight away so no photos,




20 comments:

  1. I rediscovered a rhubarb plant today whilst mowing the bee plot...I actually mowed some down!! I had forgotten I'd even put it there!!

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    1. A welcome surprise then, Tanya

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  2. Such beautiful flowers. Even though I don't plant flowers specifically for cutting (yet!) we do have several perennials that grow abundantly enough that I don't mind snipping a few flowers off to bring indoors, such as hydrangeas & roses. Unfortunately, I'll likely have to wait a while until any of these are in bloom.

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    1. I am trying to make sure that I have flowers to cut ,Margaret but there are not many at the moment,

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  3. I love rhubarb and think there's nothing boring about it! I'm not sure what variety I am growing but I've wondered if I should try for a different, more tasty variety.

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    1. I'm not sure that there is much difference in taste between varieties, Jennifer,

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  4. I've got no clue about the flowers, but usually when I want more of a color in a mix, I collect seeds from that colored flower. Mostly it works. And rhubarb isn't boring :> It is delicious.

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    1. Maybe I should try collecting flower seed, Daphne but I'm always concerned that the seed will not germinate or not come true,

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  5. I'd say it's Timperley Early. I love sweet rocket, I've never grown white ones though but it's got a beautiful scent. I haven't collected seed so I'm afraid I can't help you there.

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    1. Spot on, Jo. The scent is a revelation,

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  6. Veg gardeners never tire of admiring each other's Rhubarb! (Mine is not quite on the same scale as yours...)

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    1. We don't pick it all and so the clumps build up ij strength, Mark.

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  7. Your sweet rocket is lovely and looks so pretty in the posy! You post away re your rhubarb...I shall squint jealously!!! xxx

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    1. I'll be cutting more sweet rocker today to replenish the vases, Dina, Maybe this time I'll look for bits in bud to see if they last longer

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  8. Fabulous rhubarb, again I'm very envious. I always seem to say that when I come here don't I? There are some absolutely amazing rhubarb patches at our site. Alas none of them are mine. I'm determined to get there though, it's such a wonderful crop to have so early in the year.

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    1. I hate to mention it CJ but there are a couple more clumps not photographed. You woll get there - it just takes a while for the clump to build up

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  9. The flowers look very similar to what we call wild phlox over here in Nova Scotia. I must check to see if the petals are four or five. Ours grew all through the edges of the woodland in our last house and was a sight to behold in full bloom and the fragrance lovely. It is biennial. Is your wild rocket? As for the rhubarb, perfectly perfect. Gorgeous in fact.

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    1. It is a wild flower Brenda and belongs to the brassica family

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  10. Sweet rocket has such a fabulous scent Sue. I came home with a white flowering plant from our garden club plant sale at the weekend. Good question about the seeds but I'm afraid I don't know the answers.

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    1. Apparently its Greek name hesperis means evening Anna. Visiting the plot during the day we never noticed the scent as much

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