Saturday, February 28

Moving home

Just before you get the wrong idea - it's not us that are pulling up our roots and deciding to move home.

Often plants just appear at the allotment. We don't remember planting them they just appear. Maybe seeds or in this case even the odd bulbs find their way from the garden to the plot. They secretly grow and in due course we notice them. A few days ago we noticed some clumps of snowdrops growing in the long grass under our plum and greengage trees. I've highlighted them to make then easier to see.
In the above photos they're at the point of going over but a few days earlier they looked like this.
It seemed a shame that they were at their best at a time when our plot visits were short and infrequent. As I have posted we wanted some snowdrops for the front garden but when we visited the garden centre very few were on offer. We both separately had come to the conclusion that it would be a good idea to transfer the clumps from the plot to the garden and that it was now a good time to do this.

So the bulbs were lifted ...
... and a short time later the clumps were split, cleared of grass and weeds and rehomed. Some went in the front garden bed as planned and the rest went into the blue and white border in the back garden. Again I have highlighted the clumps.
The clumps will increase and should add some early splashes of spring for the next few years.

Can anyone have too many snowdrops?



29 comments:

  1. It is utterly impossible to have too many snowdrops. I bet you can't wait for those little clumps of the beauties to bulk up!

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  2. That is a nice bit of serendipity for you. Snowdrops are one of the bulbs I don't have.

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  3. These are the best sort of plants ~ for free! I hope they prosper and multiply for you. I love snowdrops, but I shall opt to be overrun by Muscari instead. ~~~Deb

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    1. Muscari that I plant seem to disappear, Deb which isn't like them at all.

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  4. I only have a few snowdrops in the garden, they've been here since we moved in twenty one years ago, yet they haven't increased at all, so I'd have definitely done the same as you and brought them home from the plot.

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    1. That is strange Jo Maybe they are choice varieties that are more restrained,

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  5. I love volunteers like that. I wish some Snowdrops would drop in on me!

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    1. In the garden we have volunteer hellebores that are now spreading outside of their allocated area and a lovely volunteer daphne which is now quite large. I feel a post coming on!

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  6. How lovely that they just appeared. I'm sure they'll do well in their new spot, they must be quite determined!

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    1. Just as long as they don't sulk CJ

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  7. I noticed snowdrops on the bee plot just last week...I think it's wonderful how nature gets it's own way!!

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    1. It is , Tanya plants have a great survival instinct

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  8. Nope, I don’t think anyone can have too many snowdrops, and when they come for free – even better! Snowdrops are one of those bulbs that are really great to transplant in the green, most of mine are bought in the green, sent me in the post and when they arrive they look a bit sorry and yellow and limp after days in a box. But they soon perk up and come back next year looking even better.

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    1. That's what we thought, Helene that it was the ideal tine to move them.

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  9. I am about to do the exact same thing myself tomorrow, weather permitting that is.
    You are wise to take them home with your Sue - far better enjoyment in your garden than at the plot.
    You can never have too many snowdrops, how can you dare to ask the question....lol!

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    1. Exactly, Angie Great minds eh?

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  10. The answer to the question is a most resounding NO Sue :) What a good move on your part.

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  11. It would be nice to leave just one or two where you found them - if only to see what happens - obviously they really liked that particular little spot :)

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    1. Actually, Anon, we had time leave a small clump as they were too deep and firmly plante to remove without damaging them completely.

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  12. Noone can EVER have too many snowdrops. It's funny how plants and bulbs just appear isn't it, I have the most beautiful clump of crocus that I have never planted.....always such a windfall.xxx

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    1. It's why you have to weed very carefully, Dina

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  13. That's very good free plant to have! They are just so pretty flowers!

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  14. No such thing as too many snowdrops, and that clump will benefit from having been split. They get congested after a few years and then don't flower so well.

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