Wednesday, March 19

Marching on to spring


 Copyright: Original post from Our Plot at Green Lane Allotments http://glallotments.blogspot.co.uk/ author S Garrett


30 comments:

  1. Spring has most definitely sprung! Beautiful Chaenomeles. What is the pink blossom? Is it a peach?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. The pink blossom just opening is nectarine, Sarah

      Delete
  2. Very nice. There's certainly plenty of colour around now.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. There is, Jo and it is most welcome

      Delete
  3. The garden is scarily Marching on just now isn't it? I agree, great colours - loved the periwinkle especially :-)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It's a lovely colour isn't it, Shirley?

      Delete
  4. Would you tell me the names of that flowers obove? Some are so unusual for me. Thanks for sharing

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. In this order:
      Viburnum - not sure which as it is in a neighbours garden and popping over the fence
      Pieris - Forest Flame
      Daphne Mezereum - very fragrant - this one was planted by birds
      Nectarine blossom
      Pulmonaria
      Rosemary - herb used in cooking
      Chaenomeles japonica - grown from a pip so unknown variety
      Vinca minor 'Purpurea
      Camellia - unknown variety

      Delete
  5. What a lovely show of colours - "Richard Of York Gave Battle In Vain"?? (remember that from your teaching days?)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I remember it from when I was at school, Mark.

      Delete
  6. Gorgeous, each and every one.

    ReplyDelete
  7. Beautiful! Your Japanese quince seems covered with blooms.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It is Alain, Not bad to say it grew from a pip from a plant in my father-in-law's garden.

      Delete
  8. Beautifull, love the idea of flowering plants!!! Never enough!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Very true Aga and thank for your comment

      Delete
  9. Replies
    1. My pleasure, Bonnie, literally

      Delete
  10. Nature provides us with such beautiful colours which are especially welcome after the bare stems of winter. Do you use a high spec camera?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Its a fairly high spec camera, L Panasonic Lumix DMC FZ72 bought really as it has a very good lens range,

      Delete
  11. What a lovely selection of blossom, it is very cheering to look at these images.xxx

    ReplyDelete
  12. Great 'photos Spring is always the best season to me as it heralds the end of Winter. The viburnum looks as if it could be V.tinus but don't take my word for it as I didn't recognise the Pieris even though I have two in the garden! Your close-up threw me completely.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I thought it could be tinus, Rick. It can be surprising to observe familiar thing closely.

      Delete
  13. Beautiful Sue. I particularly like the flowering quince, we had these when I was little and I've always loved them. My father used to make wine from the fruit, and my mother made jelly from the leftover pulp. The camellia is wonderful too, I do love them, they always look so luxurious for this time of year.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I've never used the fruits, CJ although we have a cydonia quince on the plot the produces beautiful fruit.

      Delete
  14. What a pretty flowers they are! I guess some of the bloom shall create sweet fruits for you!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Just the nectarine Malar - if we are lucky

      Delete

Thank you for visiting and leaving a comment - it is great to hear from you and know that there are people out there actually reading what I write! Come back soon.
(By the way any comments just to promote a commercial site, or any comments not directly linked to the theme of my blog, will be deleted)
I am getting quite a lot of spam. It isnot published and is just deleted. I have stopped sifting through it and just delete any that ends up in my spam folder in one go so I am sorry if one of your messages is deleted accidentally.
Comments to posts over five days old are all moderated.