Wednesday, November 27

Forgotten Fruit?


26 comments:

  1. What glorious leaf colour! Our medlar leaves haven't started to colour up yet. That's something to look forward to!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. We actually bought it for its ornamental qualities Crystal.

      Delete
  2. Ah, monkey's bottom, to put it as politely as I can. I know you are supposed to blet them, but from what I've heard I've never really fancied them. A beautiful ornamental tree though. Maybe the wildlife will enjoy the fruits.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. The term I heard was 'dog's bottom' again put politely. We took a one in to our greengrocer as he had never seem one and was put off when we told him the common name he didn't fancy eating one. I'm hoping the birds like them.

      Delete
  3. I don't think so, I think you're bletting them. I've never really fancied medlars, or anything else which you eat in a state of decay. It doesn't really sound tempting, does it?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. No bletting, Jo they are staying on the tree. They are not particularly tempting.

      Delete
  4. I have never tasted medlars (we are too cold for them) but overripe persimmon car be delicious (we are also too cold for them but you find them in shops). I have never seen medlar fruits in shops though. This probably tells you a lot about how tasty they are.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. We once made medlar jelly, Alain but the taste was rather nondescript. I do like persimmons rthough

      Delete
  5. I used to collect them from our local garden centre - they had a tree at the beginning of their drive - I tried bletting them last year but, to be quite honest, the smell put me off - and now, guess what - they've chopped the tree down - I think that's going a bit far just to stop me collecting the fruit. What do you say?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It was excessive Elaine. To be honest they put us off too but it's a pretty tree.

      Delete
  6. Have you ever tasted one Sue? What are they actually like, because they look horrible (to think about eating that is, they look nice and ornamental to grow!)

    Also what is bletting?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Bletting is a challenge Rozzie. The idea is that you pick the fruit and then leave it to over ripen to the point just before the fruit starts to decay. The challenge is knowing when that point has been reached. This is supposed to increase the sugars and make the fruits more edible! You don't eat medlars as raw fruit but use them (if you really want to) to make jellies and cheese etc, We did make medlar jelly once but it was unremarkable. The trouble is you couldn't really tell which was the medlar and which just the sugar..

      Delete
    2. Ah...that sounds kind of disgusting, I don't think I would want to try that. I won't go near anything with mold on it, let alone put it in my mouth. I would have to cut it open to see inside before I even chanced eating it.

      Delete
    3. I was happy when I found out that figs grown in the UK - so for that read in our greenhouse - weren't pollinated by fig wasps.

      Delete
  7. I'm dismayed to read that your greengrocer didn't recognise them. Reminds me of when a cashier in a supermarket once held up an avocado and asked "Is this a grapefruit?".

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. They are not really likely to be sold at the cash and carry though, Mark. Thinking of misidentified fruit I did over hear a couple of women discussing greengages and coming to the conclusion that they were tiny green apples.

      Delete
    2. A cashier in Tesco once held up a courgette and asked me what on earth it was...a courgette, its not like you can't buy them in every supermarket! (They just won't be as nice as home-grown obviously)

      Delete
    3. Was this recently or before courgettes were as common? - Having said that they have been around for a while haven't they? When I was a student I bought a globe artichoke in Leeds market and the stall holder said he had been dying to ask someone how they cooked it. I replied no idea I am buying it to draw.

      Delete
  8. They are such a weird and wonderful fruit aren't they, to be honest, I'm rather afraid of the things!!! Fascinating to look at though.xxx

    ReplyDelete
  9. The fruit look so funny! What is the taste? The leaves look so beautiful in yellow!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. The taste isn't special Malar - If I had to describe it maybe an over-ripe mushy apple which is almost fermenting. Anyone else tasted one and can describe it?

      Delete
  10. An unique and interesting fruits. I have never seen here. I'm really want to try plant this unique species. Very challenging.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. You don't see many here Endah although it seems that could be changing as one nurseryman tells me that they are selling lots of them at the moment.

      Delete
  11. Lovely photos...I really wouldn't know what to do with a medlar???

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I think we have decoded that the best thing to do is leave them on the tree, Tanya.

      Delete

Thank you for visiting and leaving a comment - it is great to hear from you and know that there are people out there actually reading what I write! Come back soon.
(By the way any comments just to promote a commercial site, or any comments not directly linked to the theme of my blog, will be deleted)
I am getting quite a lot of spam. It isnot published and is just deleted. I have stopped sifting through it and just delete any that ends up in my spam folder in one go so I am sorry if one of your messages is deleted accidentally.
Comments to posts over five days old are all moderated.