Monday, August 21

The wrong sort of weather

Last week the weather was just what you don't want when there is almost ripe fruit hanging on the trees and onions are being 'dried' outdoors. It was wet and windy. Plot visits have more or less been confined to a quick harvest and watering in the greenhouse. During the week, Martyn did manage to strim the grass paths and I started a bit of tidying but any activity was interspersed with coffee breaks in the shed avoiding the showers.

Sunday we managed a full afternoon, I tidied the strawberry beds and Martyn lifted potatoes and did some tidying and of course we both harvested.
This year our overwintered onions have provided us with a crop up until the summer ones being lifted. The ones above are Radar.
15 August
The cabbage in the collection above weighed in at 2.7 kg (just a smidgeon under 6lb). It was another of the so called small cabbages. I prepared it and filled a large freezer bag to be kept in the fridge to use throughout the week. It keeps quite well this way.
We now have a steady supply of tomatoes from the garden greenhouse and from outside on the plot. Incredibly, those planted outdoors are ripening sooner than those in the plot greenhouse. So far we have harvested Sungold and Gardeners' Delight. The pace of ripening is steady, just enough to provide us with fresh fruits for lunch. 

We are still cropping watercress from our garden pond but it looks as though this will soon be ready to be cut back.
We are picking peaches and nectarines from the trees in the garden greenhouse and they are chin drippingly juicy.

We also have figs ripening in the garden. Just enough to add to our fruit salads.

I'm still picking peas, blackberries and blueberries on each visit to the plot. 
17 August
Martyn dug more potatoes - this time the variety is Vivaldi and Nadine. Again there was no pest although one potato did have the possible sign of blight. This may have been something else as it is strange that we haven't noticed a problem with the foliage, other than there being wilting due to a lack of rain. Also only one potato was affected. We have now sampled Casablanca, Orla, Amour and Vivaldi and all have produced very tasty tubers. Despite the lack of rain or any artificial watering, Vivaldi has produced some good sized potatoes.
We haven't grown summer squash before so the Yellow Scallop below is our first ever summer squash harvest,
We are being kept busy picking and preparing climbing French and runner beans. All our varieties are now cropping. So far this is the only crop that is giving us anything that could be called a glut. The courgettes seem surprisingly shy to produce this year.
I guess you could say that we have a glut of sweet peas but it's a glut that I can happily cope with.
19 August
The greengages are ripe and deliciously sweet in spite of the fact that they are not the prettiest looking fruit. All the fruit within reach from our two trees has been picked now.
We are also still picking Victoria plums and still the wasps have kept away. Coincidence or are the waspinators working. At the moment they have been weather battered and so have been given a makeover. This time to strengthen them I have used a double layer of paper bags.

We are picking apples to eat fresh from the plot and the garden. The ones  below are the variety that we think is Discovery.
The ones below is Peasgood Nonsuch picked from the garden. They were cooked and mixed with some blackberries.
We had been waiting to pick a fruit from one of our small apple trees. This has been the first year that Baya Marisa, or to give it, it's more easily remembered name Tickled Pink, has produced fruit. The flesh of the fruit is red almost to the core as can be seen in the photo below.
 I expected a sweet tasting apple but we found it to have a sharp, tart flavour.
The potatoes below are Nadine.
20 August
I thought that I would give you a break from photographs of sweet peas but I have to include a photos representing our flower harvest. The flowers below were picked from our perennial and annual beds.
Martyn has produced a video about our Vivaldi harvest. The video is just over 8 minutes long.




22 comments:

  1. What a great harvest. I'm a big fan of patty pan squash, one plant gives such a big harvest and goes on all summer, in fact, I think I might have to find room for a plant next year. You do so well with the peaches and nectarines, all that paint brush pollinating certainly pays off.

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    1. I'm expecting the peach and necterine to have a rest next year, Jo. It may be the apricot's turn to have a lot of fruit.

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  2. Good news about the Vivaldi. All my spuds are coming up the size of bakers, courtesy of the additional rainfall Edinburgh has had. I've only got two courgette plants but they are producing a steady flood of fruit. Now flowers - I cant't compete with you on that front, nor fruit...

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    1. Ours had big tubers too, Mal. They seem to have done well in both wet and dry conditions. How did you rate the taste?

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  3. Ooh, that 'Tickled Pink' apple (great name) is making me salivate! Looks great as does the rest of your lovely harvest photo shots. Another windy few days has been most unwelcome and today we've got misty rain :-(

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    1. We were rained off late afternoon too, Belinda.

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  4. Wow, the rainy weather doesn't seem to have put a dent in your harvests. You've got a terrific variety of goodies and as ever I am envious of all that fabulous fruit.

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    1. It's a case of dodging showers to pick he crops, Michelle.

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  5. Those Tickled Pink apples are so pretty - I don't think I've ever seen one with that much of a blush inside. Too bad about the rainy weather though.

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    1. It's the first apple we have seen like this too, Dave,

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  6. That's great you're overwintered onions did so well. And I've always wondered about greengages, it's good to know they are wonderfully sweet. I have to say, your potato harvests look exceptional.

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    1. Greengages were a revelation, Phuong

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  7. What a fantastic and varied harvest, envious of those lovely fruits and would love to sink my teeth in those peaches and nectarines. Do you freeze you cabbage cooked or uncooked?

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    1. We freeze the cabbage uncooked, Norma.

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  8. That's awesome harvest Sue! Red flesh apple is totally new to me! They look like plum to me! ;)

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    1. The red apple was new to us too, Malar

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  9. Wrng weather or not, that is still an outstanding harvest :)

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    1. We are satisfied with it, Jayne

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  10. What a wonderful harvest of goodies..

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    1. We are enjoying it while it lasts, Julie

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  11. What wonderful onions! Those cabbages are certainly coming up trumps. Those peaches look delicious, as does the pink apple. Good that you have figs, all mine fell off weeks ago. My courgettes are really slow this year too, I did re-sow them though. I do like your colourful beans.xxx

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    1. I've been surprised at the lack of courgettes this year, Dina.

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