Friday, April 10

April tree following - The medlar

It seems to have taken a long time for the medlar buds to progress from the stage on the left to that on the right this year. The medlar isn't exceptional in this as most of the shrubs and trees in the garden have been reluctant to expose their leaves to the poor March weather.
This has given me the opportunity to observe the buds in more detail. Now the sun has finally decided to visit, I'm guessing that growth will speed up. 

After a day or two of sunny days things have speeded up.
 I love the fresh, green shoots of spring ; it's such a vibrant colour

As soon as the new shoots appear the aphids home in.
 This little garden helpers has been spotted browsing the branches.

Let's hope our feathered friends make a good job of controlling the less welcome visitors.

If you want to read about more of the trees that are being followed then  pop across and visit Lucy's blog.








25 comments:

  1. Very detailed shots! I've (well Mike actually) moved our fruit trees in pots closer to the feeder to encourage the birds to gobble up the aphids x

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    1. As long as no bull finches turn up, Jo :)

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  2. I hope that bird does the trick. And he is such a pretty bird.

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    1. There are quite few great tits and blue tits to help out, Daphne. They usually keep our roses clean.

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  3. Great shots! Very clear pictures!

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  4. Buds do make the most amazing subjects. Your photographs are amazing!

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  5. Beautiful photos...and darn those aphids!

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    1. At least they provide necessary good for the birds, Anna.

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  6. Great close ups Sue - apart from the aphids, of course! I hope that little fella is able to help keep them under control. I plucked a couple of ladybirds from my neighbours hedge and gave them a home on one of my roses.

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    1. I'm sure the birds will do their best, Angie especially any with young to feed.

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  7. Oh my goodness that's such a cute long-tailed tit! My friendly robin at the allotment performed well the other day, hopping on to my spade handle, if only I'd had a camera.

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    1. We had a robin perch on the cultivator handlebar the other day, Lou. I had my camera but it refused to focus in the bird.

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    2. Oh darn, that always happens. A robin came within touching distance today at the plot too. Too cute.

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  8. The Long-Tailed Tits have such "snub noses" that you wouldn't think they would be much good at eating aphids. I am having huge problems with aphids on my chillis this year (indoors so far of course). I think many types of aphid have developed an immunity to the bug-killers currently available.

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    1. I think it is a bit like antibiotics, Mark. Bugs evolve to develop an immunity.

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  9. I wish I could attract some long tailed tits to my garden, they're such pretty little birds. We have them at the plot apparently but I've never seen them. Urgh, aphids, I'm glad they're not really that size, aren't they horrible?

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    1. Sometimes the long tailed tits arrive in a flock and gather on a feeder, Jo. There are tails going off in n all directions, the trouble with aphids is that they are so prolific.

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  10. That's an incredible shot of the aphids.. well done!

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    1. Thanks, Jessica. They're not the most photogenic of creatures.

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  11. Wow! Those aphids are amazing, what a brilliant pic, it makes me almost fond of the wee things! I love the fresh green shoots too, they do seem late this year!xxx

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    1. Aphids are one species that I won't be becoming fond of, Dina.

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  12. I love watching the trees putting a new coat of leaves. I drove from work this morning and the picture of super green chestnut trees made me think that we already have the middle of April!
    Ugrrrr for aphids... they have attacked my baby rose plant and its new shots. I keep checking strawberry plants as last year the green flies ate the majority of them.
    I hope that birds will be super hungry for them.

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    1. Fortunately we haven't had any trouble from aphids on the strawberries yet, Aga.
      I hope I haven't spoken too soOn.

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