Sunday, March 29

Space invaders

Recently, along with half of the gardening blogworld I have featured hellebores a few times in my posts. Let's face it there has been little else to shout about. If you are a regular visitor you will have seen shots of our garden like the one below this before.
Originally, back in May 2009, I planted six single and six double varieties bought as young plants.

These were potted up and, as the bed in the garden wasn't ready for planting up, later transferred to the plot to grow on.


In April 2010 the plants were planted in their permanent positions and here they have thrived so much so that they have self seeded with abandon.
Other than trimming off leaves each year prior to them flowering, I have left them to their own devices. New plants have mingled with their parents and some have moved out if their allocated bed.

In the first photograph can you spot the log roll edging that forms a boundary between the bed in which hellebores were planted and the bird bath bed which is planted up with spring bulbs. Below you can see a hellebore nestling up to a clump of spring bulbs, having jumped the boundary.
What's more it isn't alone as here is another ...
... and another is growing almost from under the bird bath.
I think some action may be required in the near future. Maybe an assessment of the flower quality and then I need to decide whether to move them back amongst the rest of their family or to the plot.

I did plant some more varieties last year but didn't expect them to flower this year but one has defied expectation.
A final photo before they fade.

Copyright: Original post from Our Plot at Green Lane Allotments http://glallotments.blogspot.co.uk/ author S Garrett

34 comments:

  1. It looks as if you ought to be in business selling young Hellebore plants! Mine have a long way to go before they are like yours. Maybe in a few years' time... I am really keen on the dark-coloured ones. They are my current favourites.

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    1. I like the dark ones too, Mark but I think being planted with the lighter ones shows then off.

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  2. I love bursting at the seams planting with no spaces in between and I wouldn't mind being invaded by those lovely hellebores. At our gardening club, we had a session on plants we wished we had never introduced http://gardenersfridayforum.blogspot.co.uk/2015/03/plant-at-your-peril.html

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    1. I'll go and have a look, L. I'm happy to let these self seed.

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  3. It doesn't take long for them to clump up Sue does it? Where did you get your young plants from? Patience is required but it's most exciting to wait to see seedlings flower for the first time :) I usually move any seedlings that I spot as they may interfere with the growth/maintenance of the parent plant especially if they are growing in the crown.

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    1. I bought them from Hayloft, Anna. They sell collections at quite a reasonable price,

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  4. You're a wonderful gardener ! I see you have great ideas for flower arrangements !
    Have a lovely Sunday :)

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  5. Same thing is happening to a friend's hellebores in the garden under my window. Some have self-seeded into the shingle bench area so we spent a happy hour potting these up on Thursday while there was still a bit of warmth in the day. (Unlike today!) Hopefully I'll be able to have a few for the shady border near the veg patch.

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    1. Our seedlings don't appear to cause any problems Caro it's a case of survival of the fittest.

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  6. They're obviously happy where they are. They such lovely plants and with so many different colours to choose from, there's something for everyone's taste.

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    1. They are Jo,and it's such a bonus thst they flower at a time of year when not much else does

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  7. What a lovely collection, they are obviously happy, you shall have new plants forever! I'm rather jealous!xxx

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    1. I guess when they flower some of the seedlings may be very disappointing, Dina

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  8. I have had no luck with my hellebores at all {I don't think they liked being planted under the yew tree somehow} but now I am a gnashing and a wailing for I think I've been a pullin' up the seedlings thinking they are ivy! Drat! Yours are amazing!

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    1. My motto Deb is if in doubt leave it until you find out. This way I ended up with a lovely daphne that I had never planted

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  9. They certainly have invaded Sue....although I think of this as a good invasion as they aren't weeds as such even if you don't want them where they are!! They are really pretty....I will have to do a bit of research and see if the bees like them as they seem to do so well. what varieties are they Sue??

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    1. Tanya the varieties are Pretty Ellen Purple & Yellow Spotted (bought this year
      White spotted Lady, Blue Metallic Lady, Pink Lady, Red Lady, Yellow Lady
      Doubles Ellen White, Ellen Pink, Ellen Red, Ellen Picotee, Ellen Yellow
      They were in a collection.

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  10. I don't think it's possible to have too many hellebores.

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    1. The allocated space is running out though Jessica. We don;t have the space in the garden that you have,

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  11. Helebore is so interesting to me. Something that I can't find here.

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    1. They wouldn't like the heat of your climate Ende

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  12. I adore hellebores, and look forward to developing galloping clusters of them as you have over the years! Love that dark flowered beauty, I saw a gorgeous near-black one at Bodnant last month, but sadly they didn't have any for sale. Next year...

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    1. That's the problem when visiting gardens, Janet. Their nursery areas never seem to have the plants that catch your eye for sale.

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  13. Hellebores are great and I think they've flowered particularly well this year here in Hampshire. Mind you we've had quite a mild winter. Great post enjoyed it. Regards, Simon

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    1. Ours seem to flower for longer when spring is cool or fairly late Simon.One plant started to flower in November!

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  14. Your hellebore display looks better than most I've seen. I think the quantity you have and the planting in drifts makes for a good show.

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    1. This area becomes shaded once the magnolia leafs up and so we decided to have a good display here in mid winter early spring Kelli. It;' also just outside the house window so we can enjoy it when we can't get out into the garden,

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  15. The hellebore flowers look so pretty! I don't mind having them everywhere in the garden! ;)

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    1. I draw the line at everywhere Malar

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  16. Brilliant display in such a short time scale. Hope mine do as well ... I love them.

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    1. I do too Patricia and hope the new ones will flower next year,

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  17. I love Hellebores, when they are happy they are such rewarding plants. Have you seen the new one, 'Penny's Pink'?

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    1. I haven't swefflng but I'll look it up

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