Monday, March 23

Coming to the end

We have now started the 2015-16 season in earnest. The first broad beans have been sown in modules, some experimental early tomatoes have been sown. I'm busily playing at being a bee and pollinating the stone fruit and the new strawberry plants will soon need planting out. Onions and shallots are shooting in modules and spring brassicas, bought as plug plants, have also been planted in modules to grow on.

The start of a new growing season also marks the end of the last and our winter harvest is seriously winding down.

The carrots and parsnips that remain in the ground are beginning to grow, many are now past their sell by date and only a few leeks remain.
Last week I managed to retrieve a few remaining sprouts and we also cut a couple of small savoy cabbages to accompany the leeks and jumbo carrots.
I also managed a floral harvest. The daffodils seem rather late this year but better late than never.
The flowers seem to have reduced in number - maybe the bulbs have become overcrowded and need replanting. In that rough ground it will be no mean feat. Picked in bud the flowers soon opened once in a vase.
So as we bid a sad goodbye to last year's crops, maybe out first crop of the new season will be ...
Looking forward to the first rhubarb crumble of 2015.

This week I am linking to Harvest Monday over at Daphne's Dandelions.

33 comments:

  1. Oh my, does your rhubarb look like that now. Mine has only just started poking it's head through the ground! x

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    1. The rhubarb is out earliest variety, Jo other types are at the same stage as yours.

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    2. The rhubarb is out earliest variety, Jo other types are at the same stage as yours.

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  2. That clump of Rhubarb will serve as inspiration for me! Are those jumbo Carrots still OK, or do they go woody?

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    1. The carrots are splitting, Mark the core isn't woody but some of the flavour is fading,

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  3. It's great to be getting any kind of harvest at this time of year, and yours looks great. Your rhubarb is well on, I think mine's some way off yet.

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    1. As I wrote in an earlier comment, Jo this is am early variety.

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  4. Jumbo carrots!! I'll say and jumbo leeks as well. Looks great.

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    1. The carrots are super jumbo Bren

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  5. Had the same question as Mark, especially as they were in the ground all winter and they are monstrously thick! And those are some nice looking leeks as well...good eats, for sure.

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    1. As I replied to Mark, not woody, Margaret just that the flavour is fading and also they are beginning to regrow. AS well as the spitting they are being nibbled more now

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  6. Those leeks look so huge. I've grown them in the past, but they don't get very big for me. I've quit giving them space in the garden.

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    1. That's more or less the size we'd expect the leeks to grow, Daphne.

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  7. Out with the old and in with the new, so to speak Sue. The last of your harvest does look rather tasty.

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  8. Your rhubarb is looking good. I weeded around some of mine today - it's still just buds at the moment. I'm down to my last two leeks, I took the sprouts out today, and I've got just a few leaves of chard and spinach, and some kale shoots. The hungry gap looms!

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    1. If you look behind the large clump you will see some of our other rhubarb is at the just pushing through stage CJ

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  9. I hope you have a good gardening year Sue. Here we will have to wait a few weeks to see rhubarb leaves like yours.

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  10. Your rhubarb looks well on, and the leeks are a good size. I ended up with quite small leeks this year.

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    1. I wonder why your leeks were smaller Kelli, was it a new variety?

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  11. I wonder if you could make a pickle or chutney out of the giant carrots? Or carrot cake? My rhubarb has, I fear, given up the ghost.

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    1. My sister has used some to make carrot cake previously, Deb but now they are really pasy there useable state, There aren't many.

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  12. The circle continues Sue. I hope that your 2015 crop is healthy, prolific and above all most tasty :)

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    1. You are absolutely right, Anna tasty is the main quality.

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  13. I dream of growing leeks like that, maybe this will be the year!

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    1. The gardener's positive thinking kicking in, Michelle.

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  14. Those are really giant size carrots! ;)
    Such a beautiful daffodil in the garden! I can't plant them here! ;(

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    1. Here the daffodil is a herald of spring, Malar.

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  15. Beautiful Flowers! I like your cabbages!

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  16. I must say I'm in awe of all your crops, and to think you still have some left! What a marvelous harvest it's been, you certainly are self sufficient...as I've said before, I know where to head to is the apocalypse ever strikes! Now, you're plain showing off with that rhubarb!!!! Enjoy!xxx

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    1. We were struggling to grow the pineapple and oranges for the fruit salad today, Dina.

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