Tuesday, March 11

Pear bush.


Do you remember that last I year was worried that one of our pear trees had been affected by fireblight?


On the Internet I read that pear fireblight was a disease that had to be reported to Defra so I emailed them with photos.

I didn't receive a reply to my first email so tried again.

The second time they replied saying that whether they were interested or not depended on where I lived.

Apparently they are only concerned if the suspected infection occurs in an area where commercial fruit or fruit tree growing is close by.

I sent off my postcode and then heard nothing. No response at all. I had been told in the previous email that if I was outside of an area of concern and I still wanted a sample testing I would have to pay for the test.

So, after doing my responsible citizen bit and getting nowhere and being told by some Bloggers that they had trees that had recovered from fireblight, I decided to wait and see what happened.

Yesterday when we visited the plot it was obvious that the top half of the affected pear tree was dead but there was new growth lower down.
We made the decision to take out the top half of the tree which means that we have ended up with a sort of pear bush.
The affected tree was a variety called Delsanne which is planted in a bed with two other pear trees - both unaffected.

To finish off I tidied up the pear bed by loosening the compacted soil and removing any weeds selectively as we have hardy annuals that self seed around the base of the pear trees.

As I fill up under the trees with annual flowers, this is one of the few beds where we don't use weed control fabric.  Not only does that attract pollinators to our fruit area but it also provides something attractive to look at when we are having our coffee breaks on the patio area just out of shot on the left.

22 comments:

  1. I think I'd have taken the same action. Fingers crossed now that it still produces some pears.

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    1. Strangely, Jo out of the three trees the affected tree is the one be that has always grown strongest and looked healthiest

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  2. How rude not to get back to you & then the response you got, I hope it recovers properly for you now. That spot will look wonderful in full bloom.

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    1. I expected a posse of men with back pack sprayers descending on me, Jo with blue lights flashing on their helmets too

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  3. The Defra response is so typical of Government agencies! "It's more than my job's worth" etc.

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    1. They weren't exactly quick to action when we had our manure problem, Mark - I had to really nag at them.

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  4. It really annoys me when you do your bit as a citizen, take the recommended action, and get a useless response from the powers that be! At least the pear bush looks very healthy now!

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    1. Just hope we have cut enough out, JIll

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  5. Well they don't seem interested do they? I bet you wondered why you bothered!!!
    Ahhh....how pretty the little pear bush looks...I bet you get pears as well.xxx

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    1. I did wonder, Snowbird, You'd think that if they were trying to stop disease spreading that it wouldn't matter where you lived.

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  6. We had quince blight in our latge quince tree. We pruned it back to just a stump, prior to digging it out, but some fresh shoots have come from close to the base, so we have decide to leave it be and see what happens. I will watch your pear with interest
    Gill

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    1. Oh dear we have a quince nearby, Gill and I love the fruits.

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  7. Fingers crossed your pear bush remains healthy now, but how frustrating to not even have a "you're not in an area we care about but thank you anyway" message.

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    1. It made me think they thought I was wasting their time, Janet.

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  8. Honestly, it makes me so cross when people can't be bothered to do their jobs properly. Hopefully your pear will be fine now, and how odd that it didn't spread to the other two. It's a nice neat little bed you have there for them, no doubt it looks lovely in summer.

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    1. From what I have read it can also affect apples and Gill says also quiinces and it is surrounded by both CJ. Hawthorn is affected too and we have a hawthorn tree on the plot and the site is surrounded by hawthorn. Now we will have to wait 'til summer to see what happens.

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  9. Excellent idea! Hope it turn better now!

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  10. I've never planted pear before. I've hear that there are tropical pear varieties that introduced in to my country several years ago. I'm interested to grow it in my home garden. Your experience is a good lesson for me. Thanks for sharing

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    1. I'd be interested to see how the tropical tree compares, Endah.

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  11. I remember my grandmother had planted horseradish under the apples and pears. Doing some researches on the Internet, I realised scientists extract the chemicals from the horseradish to treat Erwinia. So it might work if you plant horseradish too.

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    1. We do grow horseradish but it's a bit too vigorous for this bed Vesna

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