Friday, March 28

Allotment update - ornamentals.

On Monday whilst Martyn was investigating what had been happening under our weed control fabric - he wrote about this here - I cleared the long bed in which the remains of our dead raspberries were waiting for their fate to be decided. They had been left on the remote chance that they would recover. In the event one of the 36 canes had a shoot which was replanted. Once removed the dead canes were burned.

The plan is that the dahlia tubers that are at the moment being coaxed into growth in the greenhouse will be planted here.
As the dahlias grow they should give the primroses a little shade from the hot summer sunshine! I always enjoy seeing the row of delicate creamy yellow flowers at this time of year. They always grow so much better than the ones I try to grow in the garden.

Another flowering plant that is happier in some parts than other are the wallflowers that I planted with sweet Williams, sweet rocket and dog daisies. One of the first things I noticed on arriving at the plot was that the some of the wallflowers were just starting into bloom. Others were smothered by buds.
All the plants in the bed are growing strongly, however I squeezed one or two wallflowers into the bed alongside our plot patio. The intention was for us to enjoy the perfume when we were having a coffee break. I knew that this may be unsuccessful as the blueberries - being acid lovers - are fed with an feed containing iron sequestrene. Wallflowers like an alkaline soil and consequently the plants growing here are very weedy specimens.

Although in the garden we stick to the more diminutive daffodils, on the plot we grow their larger cousins some of which provide material for cutting. This year they look a bit sparser - maybe they need lifting and splitting. Not a job for the faint hearted as they are growing in rough grass.
Also growing in rough grass under the plum trees is a lonely cowslip - maybe I should plant more.
Tulips are a little more cosseted and grow beneath the pear trees. Their flower buds are just beginning to show colour. I know the experts tell me I should lift the tulips each year but I never have and they don't seem to mind.

Bellis perennis 'Pomponette' that were grown from seed several years ago also keep coming back each year.

Back to allotment tasks - my second job on Monday was to trim the lavender hedge. Left untrimmed lavender becomes straggly and bare at the base and so needs trimming to encourage shoots to form lower down the plant. I always do this when I see signs of new growth and that time had come. 
In the photo above you can see the straggly seed heads. A quick clip over with a pair of shears to neaten the shape and it was job done.
So whilst Martyn went home smelling of smoke I went home smelling of lavender!

Copyright: Original post from Our Plot at Green Lane Allotments http://glallotments.blogspot.co.uk/ author S Garrett

24 comments:

  1. What a beautiful lavender hedge. I have a tiny plant at the allotment that I'm terrified of clipping at the moment - I've finished off one or two lavenders before with heavy handed pruning. I love the cowslips and tulips too, lovely.

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    1. I think the secret is not to cut back to bare wood, CJ as this will not reshoot. I have some baby plants and I just trim off the dead flower spikes from them and any staggly tall pieces - not with shears just with a pair of scissors.

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  2. Beautiful spring flowers. Your tulips look so stunning. I hope you will post the progress, especially your tulips. I should plant it in my refrigerator... :(

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    1. I'll post some photos when he tulips flower Endah - just for you.

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  3. I love primroses, you've got a wonderful display there. Cowslips are a favourite too.

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    1. We have a clump of cowslips in the garden too, Jo. From a packet of seeds I got three plants. Maybe like the primroses I'd have more luck collecting the seed and sowing fresh

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  4. Things are looking very good Sue. Your primulas are quite impressive.

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    1. I love the simplicity of the native primrose, Alain

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  5. Beautiful lavender. It must be very pretty when it blossoms.

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    1. It is Leanan and much visited by bees and butterflies. When in flower it is alive with buzzing!

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  6. Last year I commented your post and wrote that I loved those white primroses you've got there :) Well, I still like them, I like the way you planted them in a row, it really looks nice. I want to to the same with mine, although mine are pink. Last year when I saw these primroses of yours I planted some white violas in a row along the path, I hope they'll bloom soon so maybe I will get a similar effect :)

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    1. This variety of primrose and cowslip are two plants native to the UK and are found growing wild Dewberry. There were far more of them when I was a child but have noticed that they are gradually increasing again.. I sowed some viola seeds last year but they failed to grow - I think the compost was poor.

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  7. Your post reminds me that I should check whether any of my Lavender cuttings from last Autumn could be ready for planting out... Presumably with so much Lavender on your plot, some of it is from cuttings you have raised yourself?

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    1. Some are from cuttings, Mark and some from seed collected from them. WE do have some small plants that I planted later that are growing very slowly.

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  8. Nice to see some vibrant colours in the garden/plot. I recently planted 3 rows of Primroses along my front border with white ones comprising the centre row with various other colours either side.

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    1. I've noticed lots of the cultivated varieties in the garden centres, Rooko. So many colours.

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  9. What a variety of plants you have in bloom, I love the cowslip and the primroses, my favourite spring plants. The lavender looks great, a reminder that I need to trim mine too.xxx

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    1. The lavender is becoming a bit old now maybe I should start to raise some new plamts

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  10. Cowslips are one of my favourites, reminding me of childhood holidays in Cornwall. Lovely photographs.

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    1. Funny how primroses especially bring on a bout of nostalgia, in me Victoria and Englisg bluebells, Remind me of walks with my granddad and his dog Rover.

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  11. If you recall I have some of the 'offspring' of your primroses and they've been outstanding this year. I think the plants have enjoyed the wet winter (probably the only ones who have!)

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    1. I do remember, Jayne - glad you got them going successfully. To be honest ours look like this most years,

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  12. I love cowslips Sue and I am hoping to get some in the bee plot but these things will come over time. I did plant quite a bit of lavender last year for a lavender hedge to start but it doesn't seem to have taken so I think I will have to get some more although I will plant it in between existing plants as there is always the chance they will recover. Some lovely flowers...lots going on in my head for the bee plot here!!

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    1. Lavender can take a while to get a spurt on, Tanya

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