Friday, October 4

Alive and well

You may remember that back in May I mentioned a problem with my Living Lid in that something appeared to have scrabbled about and upended many of the sedum and sempervivums planted last year.


I stationed a wildlife camera by the lid and this short-listed the potential vandals. Although neither were seen actually causing any damage both wood pigeons and blackbirds frequently landed on the lid. I'm guessing either the wood pigeons stomping about or blackbirds rootling had uprooted many of the plants.

Later in May I bought some extra plants to effect some repair work and I also found some sempervivums growing a little way away from the lid. They must have landed there during the vandalisation and taken root. These were returned to the lid.

Sempervivums and sedums really have a strong survival instanct and small pieces that had been uprooted had also started to regrow in other aprts of the lid.
These were just left to get on with growing.

Over the course of summer the plants flourished and flowered.
When sempervivums flower the rosette that produces the flower dies so a bit of tidying to remove the dead bits was needed and the sedums needed dead heading before they cast their seeds far and wide. Sedums can take over if left to their own devices.
Now the plants are looking very autumnal as the 'leaves' become much redder.
 
There are one or two tiny weeds to wheedle (poetic licence here) out but the lids have needed very little maintenance. 
I'm hoping the plants will eventually form a solid mat and the pebbles will disappear.

Now I wonder whether they will suffer another visit over winter?


26 comments:

  1. They've really flourished. They obviously like the situation they're in, I'm sure they'll eventually form a solid mat.

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    1. That's what I am hoping for, Jo

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  2. You have some very nice sedums. I particularly like the bluish/purple one at the top. I have some sedums that have become weeds here. However I do not mind as they are very easy to pull out when they grow where you don't want them to. They look very different depending on how much light they get. I have a s. spurrium that is green in less sunny areas of the garden and bright red in full sun. It looks like two different plants.

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    1. The same is true of sedums here , Alain

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  3. Well,I hope they survive unharmed this time! They remind me of the bg Aeoniums that were all over the place in Scilly, which are evidently "survivors" just like the Sempervivums.

    Now that cooler weather has returned, I'm finding fox / badger damage in my garden again. I'm seldom troubled this way during the Summer months.

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    1. They are definitely determined to grow, Mark

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  4. You have some beautiful sedums there Sue, I especially like the one Pinky one that looks like sea coral - what is that called? It's on the 8th block of photos from the top and is the bigger photo in that block. Never seen it before and wouldn't mind getting hold of some.
    I do hope these ones survive any winter visits :(

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    1. I'll see if I can find the label, Linda. I wonder whether a bit would travel through the post?

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    2. Ooooh, exciting thought Sue but I don't know, may be worth a try though? It certainly is a beautiful plant, it reminds me of the coral garden plants we had the pleasure of snorkelling round in Africa. I love plants that evoke memories even in such an obscure way!

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    3. It's Sedum sexangulare it reddens in autumn and winter.

      Funnily enough the one with flat leaves at the top of the same collage is sedum tetractium coral reef

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  5. Sue - I'm loving what you are trying to achieve here. Fell in love with sedums and semps earlier in the year and now have a few pots coming along nicely but certainly nowhere near as the eyecatching display you've created. My largest trough will need protection for winter in situ - I'm currently trying to manufacture something suitable to keep the rain off them!
    Can I ask - do you happen to know the name of the plant in the largest section on picture 3rd from the bottom. Thanks

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    1. The same one that Linda asked about. I'll see if I can find out and get back to you, Angie

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    2. It's sedum sexangulare Angie

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  6. Love these sedums, especiallty the pinky coral like one. I hope they dont get attacked this year.

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    1. Everyone seems to like that one, Sharon. I too hope they escape bird attack.

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  7. A lovely post Sue. I'm a huge sedum fan and am enjoying following the progress of your little beauties. I just love the rosettes, they are such hardy little plants.xxxx

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    1. I've seen a piece of artwork this week, Snowbird that features sempervivum rosettes. They make good photography subjects.

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    2. That was me. For some reason IPad switched me to Martyn's account

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  8. I'm becoming fond of these plants which can be planted in odd shaped containers and then tarted up with little ornaments I find in the charity shops. Should I put them in the garage in winter as I have a very small plastic greenhouse?

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    1. I leave mine outside. L. If anything it is wetness rather than cold that they don't like

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  9. Very pretty. They really have flourished.

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    1. They have, tpals. I hope that they continue to do so.

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  10. They are such hardy and yet pretty plants, hopefully you will wind up with a really pretty tapestry of colour and texture - vandals permitting...

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    1. I'll have to watch the feathered visitors this year , Janet

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  11. They are starting to fill out nicely. Could you not construct some sort of frame with netting for the winter to give them some protection form the wildlife!!

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    1. I could Tanya but I'm not sure I want to look at that from a house window over winter.

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