Friday, June 14

Osteospermum

Last year I grew some osteospermum from seed. They were surprisingly easy to grow. I planted them in two tubs and enjoyed them over the summer. Come winter to give them a little more chance of survival we placed the pots in the greenhouse.

Most of the plants survived but some didn't which left me with gaps in the tubs which I decided to fill with more osteospermum but, being far too late to raise more from seed, these I would have to buy as plants.

Whenever I don't want to buy osteospermums the garden centres are full of them, (in fact this happens with lots of things that I specifically go shopping for), but the first garden centre was osteospermumless. Fortunately the second one that we visited had enough to fulfil our needs and I bought three. 

Although these were much smaller than the overwintered plants I hope they will grow to catch up with their older cousins.

Two went in this pot ...
... and another in this one.
Maybe I should trim back the original plants to even up the planting but I can't bring myself to forfeit all those lovely flowers.
One thing that did surprise me was that the plants that I bought were described as bedding annuals. Is this a ploy on the part of the growers to get us to throw them away and start again next year or are these different from the ones that I grew from seed?

The centres of the flowers fascinate me,. As the pollen 'buds' release the pollen it starts by creating a circle of stars around the very edge of the centre and gradually more pollen appears.
It's all in the detail and something I may not have ever noticed if I hadn't taken lots of photos.

So those of you who said that I had obviously bought something else on my visit to the garden centre were correct and we also bought four mint plants too that Martyn posted about. Having said that I would like to point out that we have visited a garden centre since and didn't buy a single plant - three packets of seeds - but no actual plants. Not through want of trying though - they just didn't have what I was looking for!



Copyright: Original post from Our Plot at Green Lane Allotments http://glallotments.blogspot.co.uk/ author S Garrett

24 comments:

  1. Funny you should post about Osteospermums today as Hubby's uncle gave me four plants yesterday. He'd taken cuttings from a couple of the plants he has in his border, a pink one and a white one. He leaves them out all winter and they come back each year, so I hope the plants he's given me will do the same. I've just had a look on the web and there are hardy and half hardy types, so the ones billed as annuals in garden centres could be different to the ones you've sown from seed. I wouldn't trim your original ones either, I'd enjoy the lovely flowers first.

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    1. I guess I will find out whether they overwinter next year, Jo

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  2. Lool I was reading your post and thinking that these flowers look a lot like African daisies :D :D guess I should start learning Latin names of the flowers :) They look great. Don't trim the old ones, they look lovely the way they are :)

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    1. I think they also call them cape daisies and cape marguerittes Leanan

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  3. Oh they are gorgeous aren't they? And those pics are so artistic.....now don't you DARE chop those flower heads off...the flower God will haunt you!!!xxxx

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    1. I have to admit I was going to wait for the flowers to fade, Snowbird but by then I suppose more may have arrived!

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  4. Stunning flowers.. and I agree with the others.. no chopping of the old flowers :o)

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  5. Hello again Sue, I hope you are both well :-)

    Coincidentally, I was admiring the osteospermum at a garden centre with my Mum today pointing out the yellow ring detail. I do appreciate the small details in flowers, foliage and bird feathers more since taking photographs for blogging. This is a plant I have never grown until last year and coincidentally again, earlier this week I moved mine from an open sunny front garden (where it was being over shadowed by other plants) to a slightly less sunny spot in my back garden. It actually looks happy there for the moment. I have never thought of growing them from seed but you have inspired me to try now - thanks! Wishing you both a good weekend :-D

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    1. We're fine Shirl - thanks - Maybe we should try collecting seed if they produce some.

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  6. I'm fairly sure there aren't annual Osteospermums so either the garden centre is trying to dissuade people from overwintering them or they are something other than osteospermums. Although the former seems more likely personally I find both quite annoying, why they can't label plants accurately (or as accurately as possible given the classifiers tendency to move plants from one genus or species to another)is a mystery to me. It doesn't promote anyones understanding of gardening to mislabel things.

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    1. I wonder whether it's because they are half hardy perennials, Loz but if so they should say that! I've just Googled and there are some osreos that are correctly called Dimorphotheca which are annuals and it says some of these are incorrectly being sold as osteos. Funnily enough I grew some of those from seed a couple of years ago and they were oranges and yellows so I guess I'll have to wait and see which I have!

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  7. I don't think you should cut the original plants down, I think the different height give the pots character. I love the photos showing off the pollen, and certainly something to look into for purchasing for my bees!!

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    1. I'll try and watch to see how interested the bees are, Tanya.

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  8. They look wonderful! Colours are so nice and pleasant to look at, and they look like huge daisies!

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    1. The colour range is lovely Dewberry

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  9. They are a lovely summer flower - I bought a pink one with bronze edging, gorgeous.

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    1. There are some lovely colours Elaine.

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  10. I love Osteospermums, it's a must for summer :-) As for 'summer bedding plants' - I have bought fuchsias and geraniums years ago labelled Summer bedding and they are still alive and well, the oldest fuchsia I think was bought 9 years ago. I also had chrysanthemums for many years, bought as bedding plants. Definitely a way to make us buy more plants!

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    1. I tend to agree Helene - a bit like selling bedding plants so early that people will plant them out - frost will kill them and they'll need to buy more!

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  11. What lovely plants and its good to know they're easy to grow from seed. The close up photos are so cheerful and bright - would make a good wall hanging to brighten up a room.

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    1. Maybe I should add one to my Mydoodle portfolio then, Kelli :)

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