Friday, October 12

Not living up to its name

We have a small quince which we planted on our plot in 2010. It's called Meeches prolific. 

Last year was the first time we had tasted quince and we decided that we liked it very much. For a small tree we were quite pleased with the crop.
This April we were delighted to see lots of blossom had formed on the tree.
We had dreams of a bumper harvest then our poor little tree's efforts were thwarted by our abyssal weather. The end result was an even smaller harvest than last year. As frost was threatened I decided that I had better pick off the fruits that I could find which came to a grand total of five
Two of the fruits were quite large - I'm not really sure how big a quince should grow!
Unfortunately the two large fruits were split but they were fine when peeled.
So this year our Meeches Prolific wasn't very prolific at all. Still it did better than our plot pear trees which produced no fruit at all as all the baby fruits were shed. I'll forgive it this year and just hope for better things next season. We seem to be saying that a lot don't we.

By the way our Victoria plum tree is very confused and has produced a second mini cropping - to read more visit Martyn's blog here.

17 comments:

  1. I think everything's been confused by the weather this year. Let's hope that things get back to normal next year.

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  2. I do hope that 2012's weather has been exceptional, and is not going to be the norm from now on.

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  3. How do you use your quinces?, I was debating buying a dwarf quince tree this year.

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    1. Last year when we had more we used them in crumbles awpol. We had some mixed with apple and some by themselves. This year we didn't have many so mixed with apples to make a compote which we had with either yoghurt or porridge. See Martyn's blof post here

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  4. Quinces can get quite big, about half the size again as the one you are holding. Not sure if it is variety dependant - presumably yes. Hope next year is better for you weatherwise!

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    1. I don't think my little tree could cope if they grew any bigger, Liz. WE are all hoping for better things next year.

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  5. Hi Sue - thanks so much for visiting my blog - I think it must have been your first one so thankyou. What an amazing website/blog you have and filled with fantastic information too.

    I actually planted a Quince for a client last October - variety is "Champion" which in it's first year has produced about 12 really good sized fruits... they're a beautiful colour! For the very first time last year I ventured into making quince jelly... apparently you don't want to include the pips in this as they can cause an upset tummy... but the jelly was delicious!

    I think like most fruit trees they do need quite a good amount of feeding - a good helping of rotted down farm manure is good and also water. This year on the whole hasn't been easy with lots of fruit - even in Brittany, France - it was v cold at the time when pollination took place - not many insects around and the very wet start followed by the very dry period we had (similar to the UK I think) hasn't helped... and now it's back to constant rain :-(

    I don't always have a great deal of time for my blog as work keeps me pretty busy but look forward to visiting your blog again - Miranda

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    1. Hello Miranda
      I'm having a trawl about at the moment trying to find new blogs to visit and I found yours. I've also been keen to find someone who gardens in France too.

      I'm a bit wary of using manure as we had a bad problem with herbicide contaminated manure a few years ago which is still around so we tend ti use fish, blood and bonemeal. You are right though the weather this year has a lot to answer for.

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  6. I didn't get any fruit this year on my trees at the allotment either Sue. We do keep blaming the weather but let's face it, it is the cause!!

    I am looking on the bright side though...with all of the trees so well rested this year we will all have bountiful crops and huge gluts next year and be baking so much we won't have time to weed the allotment at all!! (well I can live in hope can't I?!)

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    1. That's a thought, Tanya I hadn't considered. Gluts in everything next year!!

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  7. There is nothing like the smell of a quince fruit, and the beautiful way they drip from their branches, glowing bright yellow this time of year. Nice crop Sue. How do you use them?

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    1. The smell is gorgeous Bren. We usually use them in crumbles either on their own or mixed with apple. They smell great when cooking to. I love the way they change from pale green and fuzzy to smooth and yellow.

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  8. Hope you will have good harvest of quince next year!!

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    1. Fingers and toes are crossed for lots more of all sorts of fruit next year Malar

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