Friday, February 17

Most things have survived

We've been to the plot a few times this week. Martyn has written about his activities on his blog most of which have involved a sledgehammer that I can hardly managed to pick up.

I took time out from battling with tenacious thorns to access the state of the various plants that had been left in the ground overwinter and for the most part things looked good.

You may remember that we sowed some peas last autumn as an experiment. The idea was just to see if they could make it through the winter unprotected. Using cloches on our site over winter isn't really an option as when the wind blows it doesn't take prisoners. There is still one shed close to us that is on its side having being blown over in the strong winds. So how did the peas fare - well they managed to stay happy until the last frosts but they now look like this.
Not a completely unexpected outcome but it was worth a try!















The onions and garlic in the next bed are somewhat battered but still look fine despite the ground in which they are planted being very wet and soggy.






















It looks as though we should still have a few cabbages to harvest too - although sometimes appearances can be deceptive with what looks to be perfect cabbages not as perfect when cut through - even ones that feel fairly firm can be a soggy mess inside. 






The parsnips have started to regrow but are still absolutely fine to eat. They won't remain so for long so we are considering freezing some. As the roots are now sprouting it seems it may be a good time to remind you to keep arms et.c covered when you are pulling up old parsnips as the sap can cause very bad burns especially if there is a little sunshine.

The beetroot don't look as healthy - we expected to be digging mush from that bed but we can't complain as we have had a good harvest from them.

















We still have plenty of leeks that look healthy - we could turn some into soup or has anyone frozen leeks?
Another bit of vegetable news which may be of interest is that I have won a prize with a potato! I have to confess that it wasn't even my potato - it was grown by a plot neighbour. You may think it's an odd time of year to be entering a competition featuring a potato but for this particular potato it was exactly the right time of year. It starred in a Valentine's card design that I entered and it managed to net me second prize. If I've sparked your curiosity the card is in this post on one of my other blogs

16 comments:

  1. Well it think you have done remarkably well over the winter. I have frozen leeks...I do this raw..just wash and cut them up and then use them in stews and casseroles....not sure what they would be like eaten alone once frozen but as I have quite a few leeks in the ground still I will be trying them this year that way too.

    Saw the card...it made me smile..though not sure how anyone who isn't a 'grow your own' freak would feel about getting a valentines card with a potato on it...lol

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    1. We may try freeze the leeks then Tanya - there are loits of us Grow Your Own freaks about though aren't they? And you should see the messages in some cards!

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  2. You've done well with your produce through the winter, the leeks look great. I have to pull about a dozen of my spindly things for each meal, it's a good job I grew plenty. Parsnips are one of my favourite veggies so I may dig mine up and freeze them too, I don't want to waste any.

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  3. Your leeks look fab - what variety are they?

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    1. HI Mrs J
      The ones with the blueish leaves are Blue Solaise and the greener ones are Giant Winter

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  4. I too cut up my leeks, freeze in a baggie and take out what I need when required. They also fry up fine as well as in soups etc. The beetroots should be fine. We have had our spaniel eating them out of the ground in spring, still nice and firm and of course likely very sweet but it gave us a fright looking at his red mouth. What about the peas..I wonder if they won't bounce back just fine? I'd leave them unless you are convinced they are goners. Bravo re the cabbages, they still look fine and hopefully inside as well. Great Leek photo!!

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    1. Thanks for that Bren, I've also remembered that I have a leek bake recipe on my website here which I can use some for.

      We'll have to check our beetroot - I can imagine the shock at seeing a red mouthed pet!

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  5. You must have planted out loads of leeks to have that many left at this time of year. Mine have been pretty pathetic only small and quite spindly, still edible though.

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    1. We did Elaine 100 in all. We had the space and it seemed a pity to throw them away - we even gave some seedlings to others

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  6. Does everyone else hate what Blogger has done to the word verification for comments? - if you do complain on the Blogger forum here and maybe they'll go back to the older method.

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  7. Glad so much has survived, thanks for the tip on parsnip juice, I had no idea. Those leeks look amazing - I specialise in spindly pathetic ones so am very covetous of those. It takes me about 3 goes each time to verify comments so I will definitely complain - thanks for the link. Loved the valentines card.

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  8. One year someone on our site was very badly burned by parsnip sap on his arm, Liz. Apparently where you were burned, once the burn heals, can remain photo sensitive for several years.

    I'm working on Mothers' Day cards and maybe some birthday cards next!

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  9. That's a magnificent stand of leeks Sue, and hopefully some of your cabbages will be edible too. Shame about the peas, but hey, at least now you know! I didn't even try, having heard the comments of other plot holders on the subject. The Autumn sown broad beans seem to be doing OK though.

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    1. I just found you in Blogger spam Janet - how dare they! I'm not surprised about the peas but we nearly got away with it - they just were hammered in the latest cold snap - maybe in a mild winter it would work!

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  10. Good to see the veg you have at this time of year. The cabbages look huge!

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