Monday, October 10

A quick harvest

Last week we were away from home most of the week in Somerset and so what we did harvest on Tuesday was out of necessity.
We didn't want to risk the cauliflowers spoiling or attracting the devastating attention of slugs and so the ones that were ready were brought home and frozen.
Some more mystery apples were ready to be picked before they fell from the tree and bruised. They came from one of the specimens in the apple hedge and so again is of an unknown variety, however an educated guess as them as Laxton's Superb.
I tested the pears on one of our small pear trees - Invincible and about half were ready to be removed. Some were very large and looked a little like mangoes.
I think the tree must be sighing with relief to have been relieved of some of its burden.
The carrots in the harvest group photo became part of a batch of tomato soup.

The bucket of shallots were not technically harvested but were brought home for storage. Another two bucketfuls and the onions were moved from the cold frame into the drier conditions of the shed to store until needed. The shallots always seen to store better than the onions and some are even as big.



Today I am linking to Harvest Monday over at Dave's blog  Our Happy Acres

28 comments:

  1. Sue-your cauliflower is PERFECT. Oh, you're so lucky! Mine were a complete disaster this year--the summer was much too warm.
    And pears. Well-I've been MEANING TO plant them for the past 9 years. STILL haven't gotten around to that. I think I will give up on that idea. Yours are lovely! I'm just a fresh pear eater, not cooked, though a lot of recipes look pretty interesting.

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    1. We are hoping for more cauliflowers on our next visit, Sue

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  2. Fantastic pears. My Beurre Hardy pears are really heavy as well. Just waiting for them to be ready. We were in Somerset birdwatching on Saturday, down by Glastonbury and at Bridgwater Bay (Ham Wall and Steart Marshes). Saw my first bittern!

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    1. (Bird not steam train.)

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    2. We saw both birds and steam trains, CJ but neither were Bitterns! Slimbridge, Cleeve Abbey, Bossington, Tyntesfield interspersed with steam trains.

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    3. Glad you managed another visit to Slimbridge.

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  3. Beautiful cauliflower! That's one thing I can't grow well at all. The pears look lovely too.

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    1. We all have successes and failures, Dave.

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  4. Hope you had a lovely time in Somerset. Did you drink any cider, by any chance? This year I'm sensing much more interest in apples, especially English apples, which is a good sign. The sooner we move away from the bland mass-produced ones the supermarkets offer, the better. (Some progress in this area in recent year, I think...)

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  5. Your cauliflower looks lovely! I planted a few this fall for the first time in years. I've never been successful with them, but maybe this year will be different. Your pears look huge and delicious. I planted three pear trees this spring, so maybe one day I'll have a pear. Although no telling what new pests I discover that want to eat pears here!

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    1. I hope you are successful, Julie. Some of the pears are huge.

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  6. It looks delightful. I have two pear trees and can't wait for a harvest. Hopefully next year.

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    1. Fingers crossed for you, Bonnie.

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  7. Your cauliflower looks awesome!

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  8. I can't believe my eyes at the number of pears on that tiny tree, Sue! My pear trees are now tall but don't produce much fruit. I'm sorely tempted to chop them down and start again with more interesting varieties than Conference. Fabulous harvest; I'm tempted to try shallots next year rather than onions.

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    1. The tree has performed well this yeae, Caro

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  9. Wow - that is one HUGE pear! Smart move picking those cauliflower when you did. Always better to harvest a bit too soon than too late, especially when it comes to those veg that bugs have an affinity for.

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    1. We picked more of those pears today too, Margaret.

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  10. Great job on the cauliflower, it's such a challenging vegetable to grow and that one is a winner. Shallots are very good keepers for me also, last year's bunch kept well for over a year, they shrank over time but they stayed firm and flavorful.

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    1. We seem to, for some reason , do fairly well with cauliflowers, Michelle

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  11. Goodness me, that pear tree must be on steroids!!! The size of those pears! I hope you had a wonderful break.xxx

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    1. I think the tree must be sighing with relief now, Dina

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  12. I see that your pear tree appears to have pear rust as mine did last year. Still it has not affected your harvest. I had a grand total of seven pears this year but one has gone absent without leave.

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    1. We seem to get rust every year, Anna. I do think pears are more temperamental than apples.

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  13. That's big pears! It must be so juicy! I use to walk past the pears and wish some sale is on! hahahha....

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    1. Eairs need to ripen for a little while off the tree, Malar so we haven't tasted it yet.

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