Monday, January 25

Soggy harvest

Amidst snowfalls, visits to the optician, visits to the vet, shopping, lunches out, tracking down the Flying Scotsman ... we managed to fit in a harvesting trip to the plot last week.


It is too soggy to do much but, whilst Martyn was digging root vegetables out of the mud, I managed to carry out the much overdue task of cutting all the old canes from the thornless blackberry. The tayberry needs the same treatment but it is much more heavily armed and so I need to try and match its armour before tackling it.

The harvest was as you would expect for this time of year.
The root vegetables and leeks were given a wash before posing for their group photo. In their fresh from the ground state, shrouded in mud it would be difficult to tell them apart.

Although quite a few carrots had split or been eaten we managed a decent harvest with more to come.
We don't thin out the seedlings - it's a case of every carrot for itself and so some become rather friendly.
The parsnips although of the small size were in much better condition. The beasties don't seem as partial to them and they haven't split as many carrots have. There's not much evidence above ground but there are still plenty more parsnips to harvest.
Like the parsnips the leeks are somewhat undersized; many would say the same of me so who am I to complain. Good things come in small packages after all. 
I didn't totally avoid getting my hands dirty as I dug the beetroots which is why I forgot to take a photo. I am currently on the look put for a beetroot dip recipe as we bought one from the supermarket that we really liked. I'm going to have to spy out the ingredients on our next shopping trip.

The cleanest harvest was the Brussels sprouts. We last picked some before Christmas and since then the sprouts have definitely grown.
The net is essential protection or the wood pigeons would have a party.

Other items of essential protection for me are my welly shoes. I don't feel comfortable walking around in welly boots so only wear them when really necessary. My welly shoes are ideal for plodding around a soggy plot whilst keeping feet dry.
My jeans aren't too short for me, I just oiked them up a bit so that you could better see that these were shoes and not boots.

Martyn's essential protection kit includes his rubber gloves, it's no fun sticking hands in freezing cold water to wash the root vegetables.
On our visit last week, Martyn took some video of our plot and harvesting which I thought that I'd also share with you here. It will give you some idea of just how soggy things are.

The video is best viewed in HD but for some reason if you are viewing the blog on an iPad it doesn't seem to give this option so you can view directly in YouTube by clicking here.

This week's harvesting post is linking to Harvest Monday on Michelle's blog From Seed to Table


PS. I hope all my readers who are affected by the snow are keeping safe and warm.


Copyright: Original post from Our Plot at Green Lane Allotments http://glallotments.blogspot.co.uk/ author S Garrett

18 comments:

  1. Loved the video---the birds make it so relaxing. I can't wait to get back into the garden. Unfortunately, where I'm at that will be at least 3 more months.

    Carrots certainly can do the "Twist"--haha. I don't thin either --what a tedious job.

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    1. It is lovely to hear the birds, Sue.Three more months - wow - we reckon on March being the real start of the gardening year,

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  2. You've been busy, I'm surprised you found time for harvesting but just look what you'd be missing out on. I don't like wellies but those welly shoes are a good alternative.

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    1. I am really glad I bought the welly shoes, Jo

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  3. My garden would be as soggy as your plot were it not all tall planter boxes, we've been getting a hopefully drought busting series of storms this month. Loved the video, it was so much fun to watch you pull up those big clumps of carrots! It seems that we are competing for who can cover more of the garden with mesh, but the funny thing is that the Brussels sprouts are one of the few things I don't have to protect from the birds.

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    1. Soon we will need to cover the entire plot what with new pests emerging every year. We probably need a large biome - we could also control the weather then, Michelle. Wood pigeons devastate anything green here

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  4. That's a good harvest Sue....You know I think I may have some carrots and beet in the ground...I will have to go check. I do like your wellie shoes....I have a pair of ankle wellies which are my favourite attire when it is a little drier or I am just going to harvest!!

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    1. You'll have to get digging and find them, Tanya

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  5. You have some wonderful dark soil, the result of good soil management I would guess. An impressive yield, your rubarb is way ahead of ours, have you had it covered?

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    1. It's an early variety of rhubarb, Broan - Timperley Early. It hasn't been covered. Rhubarb is shooting in the fields by us too which the growers are probably not totally happy with. The growers complain is winter is too mild!

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  6. I too have welly shoes, and I too hate wellies, they are always so cumbersome and cold! Btw...what tiny feet you have my dear!!!
    I love those friendly carrots...and your harvest. I also really enjoyed the video of Martyn harvesting the crops and hearing the birdsong on the plot....gosh, just look at that rhubarb already!!! I am hankering after a sprout now....freshly picked mind!xxx

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    1. My feet are size 5 Dina so not so small although maybe set against Martyn's size 10. Did you notice the change pof harvester for the sprouts and beetroot?

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  7. Those sprouts look great, much better than my rather miniscule specimens. I think I packed them in a bit tight last year - I'll give them a bit more room to grow when I plant them out next.

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    1. The sprouts have grown quite a lot since Christmas, Darren but the plants themselves are quite small. We used to struggle with sprouts until we started growing a clib- root resistant variety

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  8. Wow - that is muddy. I'm surprised with all that rain you didn't have any rotting. And those are some huge sprouts!

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    1. Some of the carrots had split, Margaret but no rotting.

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  9. That's good harvest from the mud! None rotted? that's good! Such a memorable video! ;)

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  10. I'm glad that you enjoyed the video, Malar

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