Saturday, August 1

There's the correct way and then there's my way

Regular readers may remember seeing photographs of the lavender hedges that I have planted around a couple of our fruit beds.
I planted two sides of each hedge about six years ago using small plants raised from cuttings that I took from plants that I had originally grown from seeds collected from a couple of plants in the garden. The hedges really came about as I needed somewhere to plant all the lavenders that I had ended up with.

At the time I only had enough plants to edge two sides of each bed but recently I have raised more plants from cuttings to add to the hedge.
The only maintenance I have carried our is to clip the hedge every year and remove (or try to) the grass that has infiltrated the space between the plants. I'm hoping the weed control fabric used with the latest plantings helps to prevent this.
With this in mind you can see why I was interested when on last week's Gardeners' World, Monty Don described how he was going to plant a lavender hedge.

He was planting on heavy clay like me and so he had to improve the drainage by adding lots of sharp sand. He also suggested planting in a raised mound again to improved drainage.

He seemed to go to a lot of trouble planting his hedge. So how did I plant mine? I just dug a hole in the clay soil and popped a plant in. The plants didn't seem to mind that I had not gone to a lot of trouble and the bees seem to approve of the end result.


There is a piece of the hedge that is becoming straggly so I need to take and grow on more cuttings.

So when it comes to replanting will I do it the correct way? No- I'll do it my way

30 comments:

  1. I love lavender, and your hedge is so lovely to look at and I know the bees love it too.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. They do Deb there are always plenty browsing

      Delete
  2. Well, I think your way wins over Monty's, in that it has a better "Effort-to-results ratio"! And anyway Monty probably had an army of helpers to do most of it for him.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It's certainly easier, Mark. I don't know if he has helpers but I don't think Nigel will be much help.

      Delete
    2. I didn't see that episode but I love Nigel! I'd go with your method too for effort vs results. I think he gets quite bad water logging in some parts of his garden so that might have been worth the extra for him.

      Delete
    3. I love, Nigel too, Lou

      Delete
  3. I'd say whatever works is the correct way. I often take cutting by just shoving a cutting in the soil and keeping it well watered. Usually half of them die, but enough of them live. Or for hard to root things I just layer them. I'm all about making it easier. Your way seems to work out pretty was as your hedge is lovely.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Gardening is never an exact science is it, Daphne?

      Delete
  4. I'd agree with Daphne, the way that works for you is the correct way. I was going to bung some gravel in the bottom of the hole next time I try.. I really struggle growing lavender here.. but that's about it.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Maybe the gravel will work for you, Jessica.

      Delete
  5. What we need to remember is that plants don't read the gardening books, watch TV or trawl the internet for growing and planting information. Your way would be my way too Sue.
    I had lavender in my front garden for a few years ago and found seedlings a few years later. All went on to make good sized plants that I gave away as I'm not terrible fond of the scent.
    Your hedges look great so your way obviously works.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I'd never considered lavender to be tricky until watching the programme, Angie

      Delete
  6. If it has lasted six years then your way is obviously the correct way for your site and your plants. Looks fabulous, and really beneficial for the bees.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It just proves that in gardening there is no correct way Jayne

      Delete
  7. I adore lavendar---I imagine that "hedge" smells pretty terrific.
    I never listen to "rules" either......and if it works--Yay. If not, well, ........the weather didn't cooperate--HA!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It does smell lovely Sue especially when you brush past it,

      Delete
  8. I saw Monty Don planting the lavender too, Sue – I have always had lavender in containers and they do well for a good few years before they get too woody and then I just take cuttings and start all over again. Just do it your own way, if it works it works!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. My sister grows it in containers too, Helene

      Delete
  9. Gosh your post made me laugh, Sue! I'm definitely in your camp on the planting front - I haven't watched Gardener's World yet but will think of you and smile when I do! And I think your lavender hedges look absolutely wonderful. Would you do a post on how you take your cuttings? I'd appreciate the advice.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. The programme was on 24 July Caro. If you follow this link I posted about taking cuttings here.

      Delete
    2. Thanks, Sue. Will follow link and get your advice.

      Delete
  10. The result seems pretty good to me Sue!

    ReplyDelete
  11. What a gorgeous lavender hedge - I love it! That title just made me laugh - I've thought that so many times. I often *try* to do it the proper way, but then when I actually get to it, I end up doing the *good enough* way.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. And does it work Margaret?

      Delete
    2. As with everything else, sometimes yes & sometimes not so much ;)

      Delete
  12. Given how good it looks I'd say "You go girl...do it your way!"
    The bees love it as do mine, I also grew from cuttings but had the dogs hammering it down until I put up little fences, now the cuttings are covered in bees, the only reason I grew them.....we are both doing our bit for the pollinators!
    You have me sighing, I record gardener's world, but haven't had the chance to watch any tv for three weeks...I shall enjoy that programme....we have sandy soil and the lavender and rosemary, and most herbs just love it!xxx

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Next stop on the plot for the bees is our row of buddleias, Dina

      Delete
  13. What a beautiful sight a lavender hedge is - I always go for the least complicated route - I expect Monty feels that the viewers need there money's worth and makes life more complicated in the long run.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. The flowers are going over now, Elaine, Just dig a hole and pop it in wouldn't make for good viewing would it?

      Delete

Thank you for visiting and leaving a comment - it is great to hear from you and know that there are people out there actually reading what I write! Come back soon.
(By the way any comments just to promote a commercial site, or any comments not directly linked to the theme of my blog, will be deleted)
I am getting quite a lot of spam. It isnot published and is just deleted. I have stopped sifting through it and just delete any that ends up in my spam folder in one go so I am sorry if one of your messages is deleted accidentally.
Comments to posts over five days old are all moderated.