Friday, November 21

Plot update

This week we actually managed a visit to the plot. We took advantage from a break in the gloom to replenish our fresh vegetable stocks.
At first glance the plot gives the impression of having little to harvest. For those of you that think all our plot is neat and tidy, cast your eyes over the herb bed that has sneaked into the foreground. I just don't seem to be able to keep the weeds from insinuating themselves in amongst the roots of the hebrs so it's maybe a candidate for weed control fabric
The garlic - top left - and autumn onions - top right - are away to a good start. I just hope the onions do as well as they did last year.
Sprouts are ready to be picked and the red cabbages are hearting.  We did consider removing the insect netting thinking the plants were large enough to withstand pigeon attack, but learning from CJ's experiences over at Above the River which was also a timely reminder of past mistakes, the netting will remain firmly in place.
The parsnips and carrots are tucked up beneath their duvet of straw.
The wallflowers, sweet Williams and sweet rocket have made good plants which I hope will bring early colour to the plot next year and provide me with some cut flowers.

From the view below, it all looks bare. Some beds are dug over and covered ready for planting in spring and other have been roughly dug over and are waiting for the weather to go to work on breaking up the lumps of sticky earth.
In the background above to the left you can just make out the sad remains of what was the lovely colourful annual flower bed that I hope, with a bit of tweaking, to reproduce next year.

To the right of the annual bed hiding in straw is a row of beetroot.

To the right the autumn All Gold raspberry canes are preparing to shed their yellowing leaves.

In the far distance you can just make out the bed of leeks. Here they are.
Hopefully these will keep us supplied through winter and into early spring.
On the other side of the plot there is very little still to harvest - just some savoy cabbages in the centre background.
The fruit bushes and trees will soon be totally bare and no the pear bed does not need weeding. More about that in a later post.
The flower bed in the foreground is a different matter - it needs sorting big time.




30 comments:

  1. Such a well planned allotment! Pigeon attack? That's really new information to me! Hope the cabbage survive well from pigeon

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    1. Wood pigeons are a major problem in vegetable gardens, Malat

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  2. Your leeks look good. I have just had to dig all mine up. A grub has attacked them all. We are devastated, they are such a valuable crop. Our Brassicas remained covered too, against pigeons AND chickens! You really are very organised. I don't have to travel to our plots and they are nowhere near as neat as yours.
    Gill

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    1. Oh no - the allium leaf miner hasn't reached your area has it F in D? Soon we'll have to cover everything

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    2. It certainly looks like it. We have never encountered it before. Have looked on the organic sites and it looks like we will need to use fleece next year. I always rotate so hope that helps too.

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  3. There's always something to do isn't there. I went to the plot on three consecutive days this week, alas today it's back to rain. The pigeons always seem suddenly hungry at this time of year, and they perch in the trees along the site boundary and my sprouts are the first ones they see I think. I'm convinced there is far less pest damage higher up the site. Although it's nice to be tucked away down at the bottom. Apparently it's frostier where I am as well though. Your wallflowers are looking lovely, I wish I'd put some in now. Maybe it's not too late. I've only just got the onions and garlic in. I wasted the dry weather a few weeks ago sorting out the compost area, although it is quite a luxury to have nice big open compost bins now. We're having our first ever allotment grown sprouts tonight, I have high hopes!

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    1. The wood pigeons keep watch from nearby conifers, CJ ready to swoop at the first opportunity

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  4. I've managed a couple of visits to my plots this week despite the gloom. Its looking much the same as your plots with the exception of sprouts which I forgot about this year, expect I will get some grief Christmas week about the lack of them. Netting and ground covers are I necessary evil especially on our allotments, where wood pigeons are a real menace every year, weeds will always have to be dealt with one way or another.

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    1. No sprouts, Rooko? Oh dear. Have you given the bad news yet?

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  5. My garden is almost put to bed for the winter. Not quite, but so close. There is so little left.

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    1. Our plot will just snooze during the worst of the winter, Daphne.

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  6. I think you sent your gloom up here Sue! Great to read that you've found time to get down and do some work. Despite your herb bed, which I would not have noticed if you hadn't mentioned it, everything else looks remarkably good and you've still got lots to keep you busy over winter.
    I had no idea that pigeons had a penchant for veggies.

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    1. Wood pigeons can't resist brassicas, Angie. It's only fair to show the flaws :)

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  7. I've got sweet williams & wallflowers in too. Fingers crossed they are looking good. The weather is very grey & grotty too. My patch has been dug over & I am impatiently waiting for the frosts to appear!

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    1. Let's hope our plants aren't battered by winter weather, Jo.

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  8. Now there is the difference between your big plot and my little "plot"!

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    1. And you can get out on yours whenever you want, Mark

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  9. The plot still looks great and productive - I'm inspired to grow sweet Williams next year now x ps don't remove the netting! Trust me the local wildlife are just waiting to pounce!

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    1. The netting stays FRG - it was just a moment of madness thought as the plants are now really. The sweet Williams make great cut flowers.

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  10. Just thinking about your annuals border. Isn't it better to leave it in place? The benefit it will do for insects, small birds, maybe even small animals over winter ... And you can use the dry flowers in arrangements too.

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    1. Hi Helena, the annuals won't be cleared until next spring. I'll also wait' til then to clear the dead sunflowers hiding behind the cold frame covered in mesh (in the ninth photo down)

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  11. I always admire your plot Sue, I look completely past any weeds you may have and always see an organised and well tended space :-)

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    1. It's always something that draws my eye, Shirley,and I'm guessing we are all more critical of our own space that that of others

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  12. It's great that you've still got so much left to harvest. I need to make better plans next year as there's very little left on mine.

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    1. Now is just the right time to be planning, Jo

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  13. Your allotment is very tidy, Sue. I liked the bed of cabbages and leeks and the pear trees.I tried to grow leeks but it was unsuccessful.
    Have a nice new week!

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    1. Were your leeks attacked by pests Nadezda?

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  14. Its looking really good Sue! Like Helena I always leave tons of dead stuff for the wildlife to overwinter in. Probably why I get so many pests but i always think they are at least food for the birds:)

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    1. It may not look it from here but we do too sweffling. One corner of a plot is an overgrown bit with nettles , bramble an elder especially for them.

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  15. I'm learning a lot of things from this post. Thanks for sharing!

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