Monday, October 2

Another assisted plot visit

We managed another harvest visit to the plot last week. This time it was thanks to our friend, Graham acting as a taxi. One of the disadvantages of having a plot a few miles away from home is that when you can't use your car things are difficult.

To explain our current dilemma, at the moment, Martyn is not allowed to drive for medical reasons and my dry eye/unpredictable forceful blinking means that it would be unsafe for me to drive. We are learning how to use public transport but this isn't an option for visiting the plot so we are very grateful for offers of lifts.

When visits are rationed we have to make the most of out visits to harvest as much as we can.
The only things missing from the collection above are the blackberries that Graham picked. We have more than enough stored in the freezer so we didn't pick any.

In the sacks are more apples. A sack of Fiesta and a sack of what we think are Golden Delicious
There's a sack on Invincible pears which is an incredible haul from such a small tree.
We picked two sacks of Meeches Prolific quinces. It's a pear shaped variety often mistaken for a pear. The fruit has an extremely hard central core so once peeled the flesh is sliced off for stewing. The cooked fruit turns an attractive orange colour. In fact the flesh starts to turn orange when it is exposed to air,

Usually we store our fruit in cardboard trays from the supermarket but as we can't get there to ask for some, the fruit is laid out in the floor of the summerhouse.
The smell inside is gorgeous; however, when we were sitting in there during the week, I had to stride across the apples and sit cross legged in the chair! 

At least we can continue to harvest from the garden greenhouse. Everything in the photo below, except for the courgettes, were harvested from there. They were used in a ratatouille pasta sauce.
As usual most mini garden harvests are used straight after picking so there are no photos to prove that we're are still harvesting fresh cucumbers and watercress.

The sweet peas are continuing to produce cut flowers, although last week we only managed three vases worth.
.
To add to my flower collection I picked a mixed bunch of annuals and perennials.

The dwarf lavenders are also still flowering so I decided to pick a small posy of lavender too.
As usual I am linking to harvest Monday hosted on Dave's blog Our Happy Acres

Martyn has been on light duties when we have visited the plot and so he has been filming some videos during the last two visits which he has posted on our vlog here. If you are interested take a peep.



32 comments:

  1. Your mention of quinces reminded me that our local vet's surgery has a medlar tree outside it, loaded with fruit. I've been wondering if I should go and ask them if I could pick them, but I'm not sure what I would do with them. Have you any experience with using medlars?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. We have only ever used our medlars once Mark when we made medlar jelly. I described it in this post and also on this web page The fact that we haven't tried again says it all really. It was nothing special for all the faffing about.

      Delete
    2. OK, I get the message! I think the vet's medlars are safe for a bit longer...

      Delete
  2. I love that photo of the fruit covered floor of your summerhouse. I can only imagine the fruity aroma, it must be wonderful.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It does smell amazing, Michelle especially when you first open the door.

      Delete
  3. I can imagine how frustrating it is not being able to use the car and having to rely on lifts to get to your plot. Here's to Martyn recovering. Wonderful harvest though, that sauce sounds lovely.xxx

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It is frustrating, Dina but health matters come first. We will just do what we can when we can.

      Delete
  4. Speaking as one who used to drive but does not any longer, I fully empathise with you on this. I hope Martyn recovers very soon so that normal transport service may be resumed.
    Your harvest is still impressive as the season winds down.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I do find it frustrating not being able to drive, Deborah especially at times like this when I reallly could do to be able to. I’ve not completely given up all hope of driving again though.

      Delete
  5. Lovely photos and another amazing harvest - well done to Graham for providing your transport and best wishes to you and Martyn

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yes, Belinda, it was kind of Graham and also our plot neighbour Jan who picked us up previously.

      Delete
  6. I bet the smell from all the fruit is wonderful indeed! It's good you have someone to get you to the plot. I'm sure it is tough to keep up with it with limited visits like that.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It’s a wonderful aroma, Dave. It is good of people to ferry us to and from the plot it’s lucky that it isn’t really the busiest time of the year

      Delete
  7. It's really neat to see all the fruit on the floor, and the ratatouille sounds delicious!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It just makes it rather tricky sitting in there, Will :-)

      Delete
  8. It's great that you're still getting tomatoes and courgettes, and it's lovely seeing all your fruit. I'm glad you're able to get rides to your allotments, although it's probably hard not being able to go more often.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It is quite hard, Phuong but with the hospital and doctors appointments we probably wouldn’t be able to get there regularly anyway. The courgettes haven’t exactly been prolific this year for some reason.

      Delete
  9. Lovely haul of fruits. You are fortunate that you have friends with large car boots that can give you a lift to the allotment :)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. They don’t have very large boots, Margaret especially as I need to sit in the back so seats can’t go down. The sacks make it all much easier then it is a case of careful packing.

      Delete
  10. I'd like to taste your pears Sue they look awesome. You harvested a lot of fruit! It's pity Martin's and your health doesn't allow to drive to a plot. I think the public transport won't resolve the problem.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. You would be most welcome to try them Nadezda if you lived much much nearer. You are right public transport isn’t an option to the plot not only isn’t it on a bus route from our house but I don’t think we could get all that produce home on the bus. :-)

      Delete
  11. I am always amazed by how much you produce from your allotment Sue. How do you use/store all the fruit?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Lots of the fruit is stewed and frozen, Brian. The apples seem to keep for quite awhile though. It’s amazing how much fruit you can get through when you are having fruit salads most days.

      Delete
  12. I am very sorry to hear of the difficulties you are experiencing. Hopefully Martin will be better soon and your dry eye situation will improve. Busy roads and motorways will of course be a problem but I would hope that one day you could manage slower roads, I will keep my fingers crossed for you.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. We can only hope sweffling. My latest attempt at trying to improve my dry eyes is doing blinking exercises!

      Delete
  13. What a wonderful harvest, Sue. And isn't it wonderful how friends help out when we are struggling

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. We are very grateful to them, Margaret.

      Delete
  14. Hi Sue, I'm catching up with your posts and very sorry to hear of your and Martin's health troubles. I wish you both a speedy recovery. How frustrating not to be able to easily get to the allotments but your harvests look amazing in spite of that. Thank goodness for good friends!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Definitely frustrating, Caro but we are very grateful to our friends and for other journeys are learning how to use public transport. It could be worse.

      Delete
  15. Sorry to read that you are having difficulty collecting your produce. It's great that you are getting transport help from a friend. I do hope Martyn's health is improving and sorry to read you still have eye issues. Once again I have to comment on the fantastic quality of produce you grow and the variety! Have you never considered taking part in shows? Mmmm... maybe I've asked you that before. I really am amazed at the quality :-) Great job!!!

    ReplyDelete

Thank you for visiting and leaving a comment - it is great to hear from you and know that there are people out there actually reading what I write! Come back soon.
(By the way any comments just to promote a commercial site, or any comments not directly linked to the theme of my blog, will be deleted)
I am getting quite a lot of spam. It isnot published and is just deleted. I have stopped sifting through it and just delete any that ends up in my spam folder in one go so I am sorry if one of your messages is deleted accidentally.
Comments to posts over five days old are all moderated.