Monday, September 4

Tickled Pink with last week's harvest.

28 August
The cucumbers have knocked the courgettes off  first place in the crop that keeps on giving spot. Some may be anything but straight but that just adds to the interest.

Another contender for the gold medal is the bean. We could spend all our time picking beans. This year we intend to harvest mature pods and just use the seeds in stews etc. I'm going to try freezing them. I know I could dry them but I would never feel confident that they had dried correctly and they weren't going to poison us.
The apples that we think are Discovery have been harvested. In spite of the tree being loaded and us being reluctant to thin out the fruits they are a decent size.
There was no need to even consider thinning the fruit of the Tickled Pink variety as it only had five fruits. We were happy with that as it was five more than it ever had before. We picked one earlier but decided it wasn't quite ripe. Then on Saturday an apple had dropped off. We decided to share it when we had a coffee break. The flesh is almost completely red and the juice actually stained the paper towel.

It has a rather unique flavour. As you bite into it there is a sweetness which becomes tarter as you chew.

The skin of the apple is a very dark red - most unusual.

We keep harvesting a few figs - I think this is their best year.
The sweet peas are still producing lots of flowers although now many of the stems are much shorter. The plants have grown much taller this year, so much so that Martyn has to pick the flowers at the top.
The tomatoes are ripening quickly now. Many are picked as we need them and don't feature in any photos. It's been time to convert some to a sort of tomato passata to freeze.
The ones below were all picked from outside on the plot. No blight this year - well not yet anyway.
The All Gold autumn raspberries have really responded well to the rough treatment they were subjected to back in April/May
The last of the potatoes were lifted. These were the second lot of Winston. You may remember that the previous row of Winston were consigned to the garden waste bin. This row grown in a different bed showed no sign of scab and initial signs were promising. They produced a good yield but on closer inspection the tubers had suffered a high level of slugs and wireworm damage. Winston will definitely not feature in next year's plan.


2 September
We picked the first of the Clapton cauliflowers. Despite the brassicas being covered with enviromesh a small white butterfly had sneaked in and its baby was lurking on the curd. This small green caterpillar was evicted. I am hoping no large whites have crept in as unlike their small cousins they lay a cluster of eggs and consequently the caterpillars cause more devastation
The onions have now been dried off and stored in boxes. We seem to have had less wastage through rotting this year which is maybe down to the dry weather. Drying also has been more successful but only tme will tell whether the onions will keep well.
As well as filling the house with vases of sweet peas, the perennial and annuals beds on the plot are still providing cut flower.


As usual I am linking to harvest Monday hosted on Dave's blog Our Happy Acres






29 comments:

  1. Wow - lovely colourful harvests. Your sweetpeas are still looking amazing

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    1. I've just picked another bucketful today, Belinda. They have been great this year.

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  2. That is a most unusual apple! Love the beans, and the flowers are beautiful!
    Have a wonderful week!

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    1. It is very unusual, Lea. We chose it for novelty value but are pleased that it tastes good too.

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  3. Those red apples are fabulous. I imagine they would make a beautiful apple sauce or tart. Perfect cauliflower. Lovely harvests, all of them.

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    1. Too late to try for red sauce, Michelle as we have eaten them.

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  4. I am always so impressed with your organization and thoroughness! I am going to have to research the Tickled Pink apple as I am intrigued. Hope your cauliflower turns out OK. I had worms in my raspberries. Yuck. All in all a wonderful harvest. Thanks for sharing.

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    1. The cauliflower was fine thanks, Bonnie

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  5. You have such an amazing bounty of fruits and veggies! And that is a lovely bunch of onions. You must use more than we do, though I don't grow any of the storage types so we have to use them fairly quickly.

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    1. We do use quite a lot, Dave and I also supply my sister.

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  6. Goodness, such a fabulous harvest!You must enjoy your meals!xxx

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    1. We do, Dina. At this time of year we are spoiled for choice with respect to veg.

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  7. What an amazing harvest, Sue! I have never known an apple to stain before - how unusual. When did you sow your sweet peas to have so many now? Mine are slowing down - like your sweet peas, the flowers are very high on the plants.

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    1. The sweet peas were sown between 23 March and 14 April, Sarah and planted out 18 and 22 May

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  8. Your flower arrangements are beautiful indeed. And it looks like your indoor and outdoor tomatoes are doing very well. I just love seeing all your onions and beans.

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  9. Nice to see your onions safely gathered and dried. Mine still in process of drying under cover. Today I planted out some Japanese onion sets for next year - in the rain!

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    1. We were lucky drying them outside this year, Mal not something we usually manage. For a week or so after they were boxed I carried them outside whenever it was sunny when we were at the plot. We need an undercover system for next year as I can't seeus being ,icky again.

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  10. That's good harvest Sue! It's nice to see fresh onion being dried out!

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    1. Now we just have to hope that the onions store well, Malar

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  11. WOW! Love them. You have different types of beans, apples, tomatoes etc... It was nice to see them. I was so impressed on seeing all your veggies and fruits. Keep going:)

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    1. Welcome WW. I just hope that the harvests keep going.

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  12. Hi, Sue!
    Great harvest, your Tickled Pink apple is unusual, I've never seen this variety before. I'd like to taste it! What do you do with cucumbers? I make pickles with spices.Do you fry them?
    Love your sweet peas bouquets, I can imagine the smell, wow!

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    1. We have tried pickling cucumber with slices of onion, Nadezda. We also use them fresh in sandwiches.

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  13. That apple is so different! I'm really looking forward to picking our very first apples - now it's just a matter of figuring out when they are ready to pick as we have so few, I don't want to chance picking too early. And you are so fortunate not to have been hit with blight - it started early this year with all the rain and I'm just waiting for a few more fruits to ripen so that I can finally pull those disease ridden vines.

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    1. We have had a rather dry season, Margaret. We have watered more than we ever have before. Usually the test for ripeness is to place your hand under the apple and lever the fruit upwards. A ripe apple should easily come off the tree without having to pull or twist.

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    2. Thanks for the tip, Sue :)

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  14. Love looking at your harvests Sue as everything always looks so healthy, and I am impressed that your sweetpeas are still going strong. I have left the last few here to set seed for next year now. We have an apple called Valentine which looks similar to your red fleshed one but the fruit is much smaller, despite heavy thinning. I think I prefer yours!

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    1. I don't expect the sweet peas to flower for much longer, Kathy. Now Tickled pink has learned how to fruit we hope for more fruit next year and maybe we will use some for an apple tart.

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