Friday, June 9

Aftermath of the storms

Just when you start to feel that you are almost on top of things something comes along and pulls the rug from under your feet.

As if slugs, snails, wood pigeons, berry loving blackbirds, aphids, blight, hard, dried-out, clay soil and a myriad of other obstacles that the gardener has to battle against were not enough, along came the storm with no name.

I'm not sure why the storm was nameless as for us it was the worst stormy period that we have had for some time.

As far as our allotment is concerned, I suppose things could have been worse but it was bad enough with some plants battered to death and others having a struggle.

Nothing we can do other than make the best of things! Martyn's video shows the extent of the effects of the storm with no name.



18 comments:

  1. I'm so sorry. Sometimes I do want to just give up, and as the weather seems to worsen overall gardening is a Battle Royal at times.
    I think it wasn't named because the winds were not strong enough, but with everything in full leaf it seemed a lot stronger and did a lot of damage, and, of course, it was bad enough to blow inland too.
    The one thing that does amaze me it the tenacity of plants and I'm sure most will recover quickly ~ but, sadly, more this way comes this weekend.

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    1. It was worse for us than some of the named storms with respect to wind speeds, Deborah. I am hopeful that some of the plants are fighting back.

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  2. Transatlantic impressions:

    1. I was surprised to see at the beginning that there was no debris on the ground. All the grassy paths were clean. I saw only broken branches at the end of the video.

    2. How well all your supporting structures even the plastic covers on the ground withstood the gales, not even tipped eastward.

    3. How quickly things grow over there. Although they start later than mine, they have far surpassed them in growth all due to the longer days.

    4. The poor sweet corn. I think that the farmers here plant them much closer together where they can support each other and protect the center of the block. It is very windy on the Great Plains, the Corn Belt.

    This was a very well done and edited video. I enjoyed it very much.

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    1. We were relieved that most things survived the gales. It always surprises me how the allotment changes from bare soil to lush and green, Jane. The sweetcorn is only about a foot apart but the plants being so tiny they probably look further apart. I'm glad that you enjoyed the video

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  3. The wind is always the worst, isn't it? Even when there's no storm, but it's simply a windy day, it can really play havoc with our gardens.

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    1. Absolutely, Margaret strong wind is just so damaging,

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  4. Sorry to see this. I always fear the wind at the most.

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  5. Just had a chance now to properly watch the video ~ I wonder how strong your winds were? That's quite some amount of damage. They were about 50 mph here. I think a lot will recover, but so sad to see the sweetcorn, greengages/plums, and the cardoon.

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    1. We don't measure wind speed on the plot, Deborah but the wind speed reached 29j in the garden which doesn't sound too bad put like that. The wind is always worse on the plot as their are less obstacles to break it up.

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  6. Ahh, nature looks her sneaky little games. I'm sure your plants can get over this and will recover, but I am well aware of that lack of shelter we can provide at allotments, when on a basically open field. x

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    1. Our site is very windy, Carrie. More than once a shed has been upended. Our shed is screwed to posts set into the ground.

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  7. I hope that your plot recovers after such a nasty shock to the system. It certainly blew a hooley here Sue and did some damage in the garden as well as making a mess. The allotment came off better. As you say it's always just as you are feeling that you are on top of things!

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    1. Our garden fared better, Anna, one or two plants developed a lean but it did depend on the position in the garden. Most things were not in direct line with the direction of the wind.

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  8. Great video guys, very tidy plot!! I've never seen onions blown out of the ground before. Still blowing strong down in Essex, our broads look like someone has rolled around in them, apart from that we've been lucky. Hope it all recovers.

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    1. It's still blowing here, Dicky but not as viciously.

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  9. I was puzzled as to why this storm was not named or even considered to be a storm, my gardens are a total mess and it's still breezy. Glad you didn't suffer too much damage.xxx

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