Monday, February 6

Snap, dig, pull

We had a few afternoons working on the plot last week. 

We had a very productive time in more ways than one.

We harvested the usual suspects.
The parsnips continue to impress. Two large ones were locked in a tight embrace.

Just for a change we took a short harvesting video.



Today I am linking to Harvest Monday over at Dave's blog  Our Happy Acres

26 comments:

  1. Aaah, good old Wonky Parsnips! Mine are all finished now, but we bought a bag of "Perfectly Imperfect" ones today at a mere 30p.

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    1. Maybe the message will get though eventually, Mark. Vegetables like people do not naturally come in perfect shpes

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  2. Quite envious. Just a fortnight ago I said, "if this weather continues I can make an early start on the garden" pah! you know the rest. 50mph winds again today.
    Great crop. Does using a spade make less damage than a fork?

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    1. It does seem that there is less daamage when using a spade, Deborah. When using a fork we tended to spear the roots.

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  3. What variety were those parsnips Sue? They look very healthy and canker free

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    1. They are Gladiator, Belinda. We have had an occasional root affected by canker but not many.

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  4. Great video Sue! Digging for parsnips is like looking for buried treasure. It was amazing how those last two were grown together.

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    1. They took some separating, Dave

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  5. How fun to see you dig up those huge parsnips, especially the wonky intertwined ones. I imagine they must be incredibly sweet and delicious. Parsnips are such an under appreciated veggie here in the states.

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    1. They were enjoyed thoroughly, Michelle.

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  6. Those are good sized parsnips, Sue. I dug ours up yesterday, hope to have enough to make a spicy parsnip soup

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    1. We are enjoying parsnip chips, Margaret.

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  7. I love the addition of the video, Sue.
    Hope to see more in the future!

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    1. We hope to remember to do more, Sue. We do - well mainly, Martyn does take lots of video but not much ends up on our blogs.

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  8. Hi Sue, desperately trying to cathc up with people and get my head around things so to come across your video was a lovely break from reading. Those parsnips were fantastic. I have never been great at growing them and the last two years didn't even get any seeds sown. I am never successful with brussels either. I am hopeful that this year will see things back on track though and maybe I will get some parsnips and brussels too!!

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    1. Good to 'hear' from you Tanya. Good luck with this years sprouts and parsnips.

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  9. At least your not effected by the cold Spanish weather!😎

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    1. I think parsnips approve of the cold conditions, Brian. No tomatoes to pick though. 😉

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  10. Lovely parsnips and great video sue. I was interested to see you using a spade as well. I've been weeding couch grass from between my rows of raspberries,...not very enjoyable, I will mulch with cardboard later to try suppress any re growth.. oh and I just remember that I found a frog today...that was quite enjoyable! (I put him somewhere safe, away from my fork)

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    1. We always seemto srab or split parsnips when using a fork, Lou. I tied one lot of autumn raspberries last year and hope tomdomyhe other this. We have been busy tryimg to decouch a flower bed. We dug up a toad which was also transported to safety. We seem to occupy parallel universes

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  11. After three hours of concentrating on a wet Tuesday morning, sitting back with a coffee and watching you harvesting crops has done me a power of good! Your soil looks fab and your parsnips are magnificent. Do you chit the seed? Also, do you sow them late? I have been looking back at my records and the best harvests coincide with the years when the ground hasn't been suitable for early sowings.

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    1. The soil is actually heavy clay, Sarah. The condition fluctuates. We don't chit the seeds. Our sowing method was described here on this post To be honest we thought this year was going to be a crop failure as either lots of seeds didn't germinate or - more likely -slugs browsed the shoots as they emerged. I resowed in the gaps though and although that was rather late it worked. I think the problems led to wider spacing which is a lesson learned as I tend to sow lots of seed just in case!

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  12. Very good harvest SUe! I love your video on harvest! Excellent!

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    1. Glad that you enjoyed it, Malar.

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  13. Parsnips look good. My first planting washed away so the replacements didn't go in until May and are rather small. They seem to speeding up a bit now its warmer

    Dicky
    http://dickysfarm.blogspot.co.uk

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    1. I hope you manage a harvest, Dicky.

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