Monday, January 2

A year later

If you have a very good memory, you may remember back in January 2016 I bought two African violets.
I accidentally broke a leaf off the purple one and rather than throw it away I unceremoniously stuck the leaf in a small pot containing a mix of compost  and vermiculite. I left this on the windowsill of a spare bedroom, occasionally remembering it was there and treating it to a little water. I posted about it here.

In July I potted seven small plants into small pots which were again left on a window sill.

Almost a year later in December I had seven sturdy young plants which were sporting flower buds. Before Christmas the buds started to open.
I was going to try and root some cuttings using a leaf of the other plant but haven't yet. The problem is will I achieve the same result if I intentionally set out to grow new plants or was my less than careful - let's see what happens attitude - the key to success?

Copyright: Original post from Our Plot at Green Lane Allotments http://glallotments.blogspot.co.uk/ author S Garrett

12 comments:

  1. That is so great! So satisfying. Hope it works for the pink one too!

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    1. The two original plans are reluctant to flower, Belinda so it's going to be tricky deciding which one is the pink one :-)

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  2. They are such giving plants, a bit like those Cape Primroses {I think that's what they are, is it streptocarpus?} I used to have a lot of both, but lost them all through carelessness.
    Yours are very healthy looking!

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    1. They are Cape primroses/streptocarpus, Deborah we have lots of those two. I have found the best way to treat them is to let them dry until the leaves are floppy and then stand them in a bowl of water which has had feed added. I feed them every time I water them.

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  3. I love African Violets. They are so pretty. I had 12 in my old house, but they die here at the cabin. I wish you a safe, happy, and healthy new year.

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    1. Before we had central heating, many years ago, Bonnie, we couldn't keep African violets in the house either.

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  4. I remember that post well, what a marvelous result, please immediately post excess to me! I'd just break a leaf of the other plant and stick it in compost too! Go for it, all to win and little to lose.xxx

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    1. I will, Dina if I can figure out which the pink flowered plant is.

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  5. Isn't that typical? We can follow all the good husbandry and marvellous propagation techniques in the world, but if the conditions are right, plants will just get on with the job of taking anyway. My favourite careless propagation outdoors is when a branch touches the ground and roots (I even admire brambles for doing this, although they're a pain to pull up!) Good luck with your propagation. Remember though, if it doesn't work, you still have the bung a bit of leaf unceremoniously in a pot and stick it in the spare room technique to fall back on.

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    1. The danger is that I try to be too careful next time, Sarah.

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  6. I never have luck with African Violet! Hope you have success with the new attempt too!

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