Monday, October 31

Meagre Pickings

I'm afraid that I haven't much of a harvest to share for harvest Monday this week. It isn't that there is nothing to harvest on the plot, just that we haven't been there to harvest anything. Also we haven't needed anything to be harvested as we have been away from home for half of the week.

Our meagre pickings have been limited to a few salad ingredients to add the lunchtime sandwiches.
The garden greenhouse is continuing to provide us with a sprinkling of  ripe tomatoes and the Woodblocx raised bed has a plentiful supply of salad leaves.

I did pick on tomato from a very opportunistic tomato plant. Last year I bought a small rose as a pot plant for the house and when it had finished flowering it was planted in a container to grow on in the garden.

I don't know what the variety is but the rose is very pretty and worthy of a few photographs. One day as I was taking its photo I noticed that it wasn't the only occupant of the pot.

Alongside it was a small tomato plant. I decided to allow this to grow and it eventually set fruit.
Last week a tomato was ripe enough to pick. I have no idea what type of tomato it is - maybe some sort of cross from last year. Unfortunately I am afraid the tomato failed to impress in the taste stakes. No doubt the plant will soon be killed as the weather deteriorates.

You may remember that I brought some of the smaller shallots home from the plot to pickle which I managed to do before we went on our travels.

Today I am linking to Harvest Monday over at Dave's blog  Our Happy Acres



16 comments:

  1. If the volunteer tomato is a hybrid from last year's plants I'm not surprised it failed to impress. I bet the pickled shallots will be a whole lot nicer!

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    1. I didn't expect anyhing special, Mark. I just left it to see what would happen,

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  2. That is a beautiful Woodblocx raised bed of lettuce. Are they Oak leaf?

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    1. It's called Catalogna, Norma.

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    2. Looked up Catalonga and it is one of the Oak Leaf type lettuce. I grow a similar looking lettuce and it is just called Oak Leaf, Catalonga sounds more exotic :)

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  3. I don't think I've ever eaten a pickled shallot, but they are sure pretty in the jars!

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    1. That's what I was thinking! How pretty.

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    2. They are really just like pickled onions, Dave and tpals.

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  4. Oh, that lettuce is looking amazing! We'll be lucky to get a couple of salads from the 2 dozen or so plants we have going as they are still so small and unlikely to grow very much more now that our temps are more cold than cool and the sun is waning.

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    1. I'm not sure how long it will survive, Margaret.

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  5. The pickled shallots do look pretty. I did something similar with a small shallot-like onion that I'm growing and they are delicious.

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    1. I pickle small onions when we have them too, Michelle.

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  6. I've never had a pickled shallot either. Your lettuce looks so lush and green! I'm looking forward to salad weather returning here soon.

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    1. It will be comfort food weather here soon, Julie.

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  7. The picked shallot look so good in jars!

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