Monday, August 22

Onions drying - cue rain.

16 August
Last week we dug the rest of our six trial variety potatoes. We planted five tubers each of Orla, Vivaldi, Valor, Setanta, Amour and Blue Belle which we bought at a local garden centre's potato day. Orla and Vivaldi, being early varieties, had already been lifted.



So far we haven't taste tested every variety but yields and observations are described below.
Martyn posted more about our potato harvest here.

The yellow courgettes are still producing but the green variety is very slow to crop. It seems to concentrate all its efforts into producing one fruit per plant which swells to an enormous size if we don't pick it quickly enough. Now the plants have been hit with mildew so I guess there will not be many more fruits.
The blueberries are almost done but the yellow autumn raspberry - All Gold is beginning to produce fruit. As I dug up and divided the red Joan J we are not likely to have a crop from them this year. The plants have sent up some short new growth which should be much stronger next year.

We are still harvesting autumn planted onions as and when we need them. The spring planted onions and shallots had completed their growing and so we decided to lift them and leave them to dry off. We have had some very dry weather with sunshine at times which was ideal drying weather. Then guess what happened. Yes it rained.

20 August
I mentioned last week that I was keeping my eye on the peas as they were carrying lots of immature pods.
This week they soon started to fill out and I harvested them before they had a chance to become past their best. There's hopefully still lots to come. A bonus was that there was not a pea moth caterpillar in sight.

Unfortunately the same couldn't be said for the Victoria plums which looked good but most were inhabited by plum moth caterpillars.
Strangely the yellow Oullins Gage plums growing alongside wasn't similarly affected.

A calabrese head was added to this week's harvest. This was produced by a plant that had regenerated after a slug attack at the time of planting and so has been a long tome coming,
Finally we have the salad harvest from the garden.
The Mini Munch cucumber is producing fruit faster than we can eat them. The small Sungold tomatoes are now ripening but their larger cousins are still hanging back.
I don't think we will have a whole truss ripen as consistently as the shops manage.

The Woodblocx raised bed is keeping us supplied with salad leaves and spring onions. More salad leaves have been sown so I hope the slugs and snails keep their distance.

Today I am linking to Harvest Monday over at Dave's blog  Our Happy Acres

Copyright: Original post from Our Plot at Green Lane Allotments http://glallotments.blogspot.co.uk/ author S Garrett

24 comments:

  1. I envy your runner beans and peas, and your potatoes look amazing. That's too bad about the wireworm damage but it looks like you had a great potato harvest.

    Hopefully the dry weather will come so your onions can manage to dry out. We've had a very wet end of summer, so the summery plants are on their last legs.

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    1. At least the damage wasn't as bad as we expected it was going to be, Phuong.

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  2. A few miserable days here, but following with another burst of summer, by all accounts, and I think I'm going to pick my apples, which is very early but they seem ready. Better that than let the wasps have them!
    Everything looks so good with you, as ever. Too bad about the wire worm damage though. I stopped growing potatoes because of so much constant slug damage.

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    1. The wasps soon find a way in don't they, Deborah? It can be a lottery picking plums.

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  3. Interesting point - HOW do commercial growers get whole trusses of tomatoes to ripen at the same time? Mine always ripen in succession, and the first ones would be over-ripe before the last ones were ready. Your harvest success this year is definitely "A game of two halves" - some good, some bad - but then that's typical of an amateur setup, isn't it?. I have just stashed 3.5kgs of tomatoes in the fridge, to stop them ripening too quickly because we can't keep up with them.

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    1. There always are winners and losers, Mark. I'm guessing, Dave is correct and they use gas on them.

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  4. Your harvests look beautiful and wasn't that a wonderful surprise with the peas! I've been harvesting a few from my vines as well, although the vines don't look anywhere near as lush as yours. And Sungolds were the first to ripen in our garden too. Once again I planted far too many cherry tomatoes and we are swimming in them.

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    1. We do sow our peas quite thickly, Margaret. Sungold always seem to be the first don't they?

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  5. It's too bad about the rain on the onions and shallots. Our humidity is too bad for me to even think about drying anything outside. Interesting potato experiment too. It looks like overall it was worth it, yield wise, except for the wireworm and slug issues. I agree with you about the trusses of tomatoes. Mine never ripen all at once. I'm thinking the ones in the markets have been gassed to make them ripen evenly.

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    1. The damage wasn't too bad really, Dave. I guess you are spot on with the tomato ripening.

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  6. What a shame it rained! Interesting reading about the potato trials, will be interested to hear how they tasted. I hope you managed to use the plums despite the damage.xxx

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    1. We couldn't use the maggoty ones, Dina.

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  7. Oh that's a good haul Sue. I'm sorry for not commenting recently but my mum has been in hospital for most of this month so I've not had much time for blog visiting. I've just come home for a couple of days before heading south again. I visited the allotment yesterday and groaned at the weeds but lifted the best crop of shallots I've ever grown :)

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    1. Sorry about your mum, Anna. I hope that she is on the mend.

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  8. I've never thought of having a full truss ripen at once before. Mike plucks them off as soon as they ripen. I spy yellow raspberries I'm still waiting for mine to turn yellow. x

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    1. Our yellow raspberries are steadily ripening, Jo but I find that they quickly spoil if you don't pick them quickly.

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  9. Well, at least you know what needs to be done during a drought!!--Harvest something that you don't want rained on! So sorry about that. Mother Nature has a wicked sense of humor!

    What a shame about the plums. They look wonderful.

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    1. We have managed some grub free plums since, Sue but the grubs have had more than their fair share

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  10. That's an amazing harvest. I always envy you a little when I see you can grow peas so late in the season. Mine died from the heat in June. Those Blue belle potatoes look really cute with all those spots on them, although I bet they are hard to sell in the market. I can already see people complaining that the potatoes are damaged :D

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    1. The peas are doing well this year, Leanan maybe due to a poor summer.
      We are unlikely to grow Blue Belle again as they didn't crop as well as other varieties.

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  11. How beautiful collection of delicious fruits and vegetables!
    Greetings

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