Monday, August 8

Here comes the Sun(stripe)

1 August
Our harvest collection was cut short on Monday as we were rained off but we did manage to gather a few things.

The blackcurrants that we thought were going to be a crop failure have been saved by the later variety - Ben Lomond. Maybe the earlier varieties suffered from a lack of pollinators although I did eventually manage to pick a few berries from the earlier Ben Connan.
The runner and climbing French beans are now coming into their own in spite of our earlier pessimism. Thinking back it seems that every year we think they are never going to grow and then they suddenly shoot off. 
The sweet peas in the small vase above actually had lovely long stems that I sacrilegiously cut short as I wanted a posy for the table. The flowers look droopy as they were wet with rain but soon perked up. The ones picked on Saturday picked in the sunshine looked much happier and who could blame them?
We are still using the autumn onions and lifting as we need them.
2 August
More berries were picked on Tuesday. Whilst I was picking, Martyn was cutting back the kiwi - which is great at producing leaves but not great on producing fruit. He uncovered one of our gooseberries which we had thought was fruitless but it turns out that the fruit was hiding under the kiwi and I managed a picking.
As for the courgettes, the yellow ones - Sunstripe - have taken off now and are now outproducing their green cousins.
On Saturday we lifted more Casablanca potatoes. There is just another half row of that variety to lift.
Like the earlier harvesting of this variety there was no damage to the tubers. Either the slugs don't like them or they have been concentrating their efforts on the neighbouring brassica bed.
6 August
Sadly we have picked the last of our strawberries - Malwina and summer fruiting raspberries - Tulameen. We do, however, have plenty of blackberries to fill the gap for a while so it can't be all bad. 
It's now time to prepare the strawberry and raspberry plants for next year's harvest but that is for another post - or two.

In my harvest posts I often omit to mention the salad crops and herbs grown in the garden which we pick in smal quantities as needed. Usually they are used as soon as they are harvested but this little picking escaped long enough for a photo.
The reason for the special attention is that at last we have managed to grow some spring onions.

Today I am linking to Harvest Monday over at Dave's blog  Our Happy Acres


Copyright: Original post from Our Plot at Green Lane Allotments http://glallotments.blogspot.co.uk/ author S Garrett

36 comments:

  1. I'm glad your potatoes are undamaged. I've been digging on an "as needed" basis and it seems I'm having a problem with wireworms this year.
    Don't you love surprise harvests like those sneaky gooseberries!! Well, at least that means the birds didn't see them either.
    Great harvests, Sue. Enjoy!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. We dug another variety today, Sue which last year was one that the slugs made a beeline to. About half were eaten - this year no damage at all.

      Delete
  2. Haha, the Spring Onion is the real star of the show, not the Sunstripe! Re the Runner Beans - I'm the same. They always seem poor to begin with, but come into their own later on. I often get the nicest pods right at the end of the season, when it's cooler and wetter.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Sad isn't it, Mark when the lowly spring onion is such a challenge. What changed to make them so difficult as they used to be so easy?

      Delete
  3. Fab harvest Sue. I'm looking forward to growing Spring Onions again next year, there does seem to be success this year with them on various blogs x

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. The spring onion is a conundrum. Jo.

      Delete
  4. Always enjoy seeing your harvest. It always looks good, even if sometimes you say it isn't as good as it should be! All looks much better than mine this year, which if I was relying on the garden I'd starve!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I don't think we are ever satisfied, Deborah.

      Delete
  5. Those climbing and runner beans are so pretty with their blooms. I know the beans themselves will be a welcome sight too. The Sunstripes are very striking as well. I see seed is available here so I will have to give them a try next year. I am thinking they will not be hiding as easily as the gooseberries were!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It's been very windy for a couple of days, Dave so those beans have taken a battering.

      Delete
  6. I always love seeing your wonderful variety of harvests. And the sight of the sweet peas makes me wish I had room to grow some, I love their fragrance.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It's a pity that I can't share their perfume, Michelle.

      Delete
  7. So many lovely harvests! The runner bean vines look very healthy. My beans always seem to start out producing pretty well and then look pathetic to the point that I almost rip them out and then suddenly they will get a productive second wind.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I just hope the beans stay looking good after suffering two very windy days, Julie.

      Delete
  8. I love the look of those Sunstripes. I'll have to try those next year, maybe instead of the Soleil F1 I've been growing this year, which don't seem to be the most prolific. Although they are quite tasty. Hmmm. Maybe both..? :)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Sunstripe are very tasty too, Darren. I think I prefer the yellow varietoes.

      Delete
  9. I always grow the herbs and salad in the garden as well. Those courgettes are fantastic, I shall look out for them too. I have yellow ones doing well this year (Gold Rush I think), but your stripey ones are much more interesting. I always find that my runner beans don't do much for ages and then suddenly they're off and away. Not many beans so far this year though. I picked Japanese wineberries with the children this afternoon but not a single one made it home from the plot, we ate them all.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I'm planning a post on Japanese wineberries, CJ. They are fascinating aren't they?

      Delete
  10. Your beans look pretty healthy. My climbing beans always take a long time to produce but then we are buried in them. And the Sunstripe squash is really attractive. Glad to hear it tastes just as good.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. We are bracing ourselves for the bean rush, David. It will stock our freezer and see us through the non-bean season.

      Delete
  11. Blackberry and runner bean season, so wonderful. I miss growing runner beans, so pretty and delicious but they're impossible to grow at our current location. Your courgette plants are going strong. Very impressive.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. The season is all too short, Phuong.

      Delete
  12. I think if you're in tropical climax, you will be harvesting bulk of harvest every week! Thumb up to you!
    That's lovely peas flowers! They are so colourful!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. By have beautiful fragrance too, Malar

      Delete
  13. You have a plentiful harvest! So lovely, especially the fruits, yummy!

    ReplyDelete
  14. Nice harvest. Those courgettes look great, I always found that yellow courgettes were never as productive as green ones, it looks like you've found a good variety. Those Malwina strawberries make my mouth water every time you show them, they're such a lovely colour, very appetising. Hooray, spring onions at last. I hope they were worth the wait.

    ReplyDelete
  15. Previously we have found the same with yellow courgettes, Jo but this year it is the green one that isn't performing. All this windy weather is bringing on the mildew though!

    ReplyDelete
  16. Those strawberries look very juicy, all in all an impressive haul!

    ReplyDelete
  17. Your harvests always give me something to aspire to! How lovely to finally see that little spring onion, that's one thing that loves to grow for me, even in pots. I think they really like sandy soil.xxx

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. That spring onion was grown in our raised bed in the garden filled with bought topsoil, Dina. I wonder what those down on the plot in a clay soil will do.

      Delete
  18. Such wonderful, varied harvests, Sue! I'm really looking forward to picking our potatoes, but also worried about what the voles may have done to them. I'm sure it will be a "hold your breath" moment as I dig around the bed.

    So tell me, are you able to eat most of the fruit you pick out of hand, or do you end up preserving a lot of it?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Good luck with the potatoes, Margaret.
      We do eat a lot of fresh fruit but freeze lots too either as it is or in a compote which uses far less sugar than if we made jam

      Delete
  19. I've never had much luck with spring onions, they don't like my dry allotment soil (that's my excuse anyway). Well done on yours Sue.
    The stripey yellow courgettes look good, so many of them as well! I haven't seen that variety before.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. We really like the yellow courgettes, Lou.

      Delete

Thank you for visiting and leaving a comment - it is great to hear from you and know that there are people out there actually reading what I write! Come back soon.
(By the way any comments just to promote a commercial site, or any comments not directly linked to the theme of my blog, will be deleted)
I am getting quite a lot of spam. It isnot published and is just deleted. I have stopped sifting through it and just delete any that ends up in my spam folder in one go so I am sorry if one of your messages is deleted accidentally.
Comments to posts over five days old are all moderated.