Sunday, January 3

Something ventured ,,,

Back in July we decided to try a late sowing of peas - very late I know but we had seed left and some space on the plot so we had nothing to lose if the sowing failed.

We sown on 29 July and by the 8 August the seeds had germinated.

The peas grew well and it looked as though the experiment was going to pay off.


On 27 October they looked well.
The plants were flowering well and pods were setting. It was as well that we didn't at this point chalk up a success as the pods just didn't swell.


On our last visit before Christmas   the pods were still flat and wizened looking.
Incredibly though the tatty plants were still producing flowers.


This time it was certainly a case of something ventured, nothing gained other than giving us something to think about for next year.

Does the plant need more warmth in order for the pods to swell or is there some other reason for the pods not swelling?

Would mangetouts be a success from a late sowing?

If summer had been warmer would the peas have grown as well initially?

The last sowing of peas from which we managed a harvest was 23 May. Has anyone managed a harvest from a later sowing?


Copyright: Original post from Our Plot at Green Lane Allotments http://glallotments.blogspot.co.uk/ author S Garrett

25 comments:

  1. I have not had a lot of success with peas. They always seem to suffer badly from mildew, whatever variety I grow. Anyway, having said that, I'm planning to have another try this year, because fresh peas from the garden are so delicious! I will be sowing an Early type though. I reckon your experiment demonstrates that Mangetout would be better for late in the season.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. We had a good crop of peas last year - the weather seemed to suit them hence the attempt at late sowing. When I saw that pods had set my initial thought was to maybe try mangetous next year. Of course it could change if the weather is different next year. As you sat garden peas are delicious.

      Delete
  2. We've given up on peas because of the pea moth larvae. I like growing purple-podded mangetout. Would definitely be interesting to try a later sowing of them...

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Our peas didn't have much in the way of pea moth maggots last year, Belinda. Apparently peas are self fertile and so you can cover with fleece or insect mesh to try and keep pea moth at bay.

      Delete
  3. I agree with Mark - mangetout (or snow peas as we call them) - can even be eaten when they are not fully developed. When we ripped out my son's vines, we picked - and ate - every pea pod, regardless of how large it was.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. We grew purple and yellow podded varieties of mangetouts last year Margaret. Does the name mean they will grow in snow? :-)

      Delete
  4. I was surprised you had germination with that late of a sowing---I had always heard how peas despise warm soil. Well, like you said, you're not out anything and think if it would have turned out!! I will be "experimenting" more with pushing the limits of seasons next year. I always have leftover seed--that will be a fine use for it. Glad you tried....it encourages me to do so as well

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. The reason we 'had a go' Sue was that the weather was on the cool side so we guessed the peas would like it. If summer had been warmer I doubt that we would have achieved the same successful germination.

      Delete
  5. I planted some sugar snaps very late (possibly August - I've tried to find the post but I can't - either August or July) and I did get a nice trickle of pods for quite a long time. The peas hadn't really formed at all but the pods were plump and juicy. I usually plant Sugar Ann for snaps.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I'll have a look for it CJ

      Delete
    2. You mentioned sowing them in this post in July CJ

      Delete
  6. I'm surprised they grew....who knows, you may still get juicy pea pods! At least they are improving the soil so you have gained that!xxx

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I think pea pods are highly unlikely, Dina. As you say it is making a good green manure :-)

      Delete
  7. That is amazing to me. Peas this time of year. It is hit or miss for me with the lettuce. Some years I'm on target and some I am off. Happy New Year.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Happy new year, Bonnie. It would have been even more amazing had they grown some peas.

      Delete
  8. I'm also a fan of sowing a few extra seeds, no matter the time of year. I regularly get a Christmas crop of white 'summer' turnips sown in September when they don't bolt like they do earlier in the year.
    I usually get a better crop with later (June) sown mangetoute, because the early spring ones run to seed as soon as the temperatures rise. Pea moth is a problem with the later plants so mesh would be useful and mildew always destroys my later summer peas even if they are supposed to be resistant varieties. Last year my autumn sown peas produced a great early harvest (although most peoples' summer ones were very poor on the allotments), but this year the slugs (& possibly pheasants) have already destroyed the entire row of seedlings.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Mildew al;ways seems to affect peas, S and D I guess it is down to dry weather in late summer. I am expecting an explosion of slugs next year unlwss we get some keen frosts soom

      Delete
  9. I'm fairly sure that somebody on our allotment site had success with late sown peas this last year Sue. Will try to remember to ask the plot holder when he sowed them. If you have got the room it's certainly worth repeating the experiment.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It would be interesting to know when they were sown, Anna. I guess it depends what the weather is like next year. If we have a hot, dry summer then maybe it won@t be worth it.

      Delete
  10. Definitely worth another go next year sue, the mange tout sound like a good idea. I do terribly with peas but really love them. I think my soil at the allotment is too dry and this year ones at home in the back garden got eaten by slugs n snails, sigh.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Qw always prioritise peas when it comes to watering, Lou and give them a really good soaking each time/

      Delete
  11. I never planted peas before. I guess they grow in mild temperature. Hope you get many harvest of peas!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I don't think they would be happy in your climate Malar.

      Delete
  12. Peas are usually dicey here too. We never know what sort of weather we'll have. I went ahead and prepared some soil and set up a trellis for a planting next spring, and hopefully we will get a few peas before it turns hot.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Generally the peas sown at the usual times did well, Dave which is what tempted us to try for more.

      Delete

Thank you for visiting and leaving a comment - it is great to hear from you and know that there are people out there actually reading what I write! Come back soon.
(By the way any comments just to promote a commercial site, or any comments not directly linked to the theme of my blog, will be deleted)
I am getting quite a lot of spam. It isnot published and is just deleted. I have stopped sifting through it and just delete any that ends up in my spam folder in one go so I am sorry if one of your messages is deleted accidentally.
Comments to posts over five days old are all moderated.