Monday, November 2

Endings and beginnings

Last week's harvest was made up of the tail end of some crops and the start of others.

Each time that we visit the plot I expect there to be no berries left to harvest but again last week I picked a few red and yellow raspberries and there are also a sprinkling of blackberries hiding under the raspberries. What was even more amazing, (or maybe worrying), was that I noticed that some immature fruits had set on next year's summer fruiting raspberry canes.
The summer fruiting canes were cut out completely and new canes tied in and these should definitely not be fruiting now.

Another strange phenomena centred on one of our pear trees - Invincible. It failed to set any fruit during it's normal flowering period despite both its neighbouring trees bearing fruit. It then decided to flower a second time and produced fruit. Unfortunately they didn't have time to grow into full sized specimens. We still picked them.
Another fruits that didn't manage to achieve full size were the grapes trained along the side of the shed. We tasted one and it was sweet despite its size and so we picked those too. It has given us some encouragement that given a decent summer we may have a reasonable crop.
We also decided to try a few parsnips. The tops had grown well but with parsnips this doesn't always mean a good root has developed. Fortunately the roots didn't disappoint. The flavour was quite good but should be even better after a frost has turned more if the starch to sugar.
We are still harvesting mizuna from the WoodBlocx salad bar in the garden but some other types of salad leaves are now past their best.
The annual flowers are just about over now with just a few cosmos, calendula and cornflowers hanging on.
A couple of years ago I grew some Leucanthemum vulgare (native ox-eye daisy). These have proved a revelation as a long lasting (in the ground and in a vase) cut flower. They are also as pretty as the 'cultivated' flowers




27 comments:

  1. That's a great harvest Sue, but how odd about the raspberries and pears. I had to cut some small green strawberries off the other day. I have a seedless green grape vine as well, and the fruit is always small, but really nice. Well done on the parsnips, something I'll be trying next year hopefully.

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    1. The grapes in the greenhouse are seedless, CJ but unfortunately the ones on the plot have seeds. This means that being so small they tend to be more seed than anything.

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  2. Funny that the latin name sounds so hideous for such a pretty flower!

    Those lettuce in your top photo are mighty impressive. Well, ALL your produce is impressive, but wow-the size of them!!
    I think Nature is turning tables on gardeners around the world. It is definately getting more challenging (and interesting)

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    1. That Daisy has a whole raft of common names, Susie. As for the lettuces for some reason the slugs have eaten things other than lettuces this year.

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  3. what a lovely last photo, your comment on the parsnips are why as diabetics we are told to avoid them if possible because of the high sugar content

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    1. I never realised that about diabetics and parsnips, David. Maybe if you ate them before the frost got to them they would be okay

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  4. There's definitely some odd things going on in the garden these days but that's really weird that your summer fruiting raspberries are setting fruit now, I hope that doesn't mean they think they've done their job and you end up without any next year. Great harvest again.

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    1. That was what I was thinking to, Jo. At least its only one or two of the canes that set fruit,

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  5. I hope my Parsnips will be as good as those ones of yours - but I doubt it. They produced very sparse foliage, which might mean poor roots too. I'm resisting digging any up until after we have had a frost.

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    1. Let's hope the top growth is not indicative of what is going on underground, Mark.

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  6. Despite the time of year your harvest is pretty fruitful - excuse the pun Sue :)

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    1. Pun excused, Angie :-) the fruit harvest is very much diminished now.

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  7. Oh an impressive haul Sue which puts my efforts to shame. Interesting to hear what is happening with your summer fruiting raspberries and your pears. Nature plays some funny old tricks at times.

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    1. Plants do seem to work to their own rules, Anna.

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  8. Hi Sue, it was interesting to see the vine along your shed, have you written a post about that? I have been thinking about doing the same here in my new and much sunnier garden. The shed is in a south facing suntrap – should be ideal. Have you got your vine planted outside or inside? I know some plant it inside a greenhouse and let the vine grow outside. Not sure if I would need to do that in a sheltered London garden, but the whole point with growing a vine is to get grapes. Is this your first harvest year or have you had fruit for many years? Would love a link if you have posted about this before :-)

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    1. I haven't really posted about the outdoor great vines, Helene. I tend to have mentioned the one growing in the garden greenhouse more as we have a better crop from that. I haven't heard of people planting a vine in a greenhouse and training it outside but often people do plant the vine outside so the roots are cool and train the vine inside.
      This grapevine is planted outside and trained along as south. facing shed wall as the shed gets very warm in the sunshine. We planted it about six years ago and so far haven't had that good a harvest. Then again we have only really just started to pay it attention and prove it properly. The grapes of also been small because they needed thinning and we didn't get it done. A grapevine should be fine in your sheltered garden you need to make sure that you get one suited to growing outdoors in the UK.

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    2. Thanks Sue, I know it will be a long-term project if I go ahead with it, mostly for the novelty I guess, but for all the work it will be I certainly want to make sure I get some grapes to eat in the end. Seedless grapes would have been great but from what I have read that won’t be possible even in my garden – I will research some more before I decide.

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  9. Hopefully the odd behavior of the raspberries was just an oddity. The pear flowering twice sounds even more unusual though! It's always something interesting with the garden, though like you say sometimes the unusual can be worrisome.

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    1. No two years in the garden are alike, Dave it's never boring is it?

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  10. That pear is just too cute! This is the first year I've grown mizuna and I am duly impressed. It's still putting on some good growth, even with our shorter, cooler days - a definite keeper.

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    1. We are now waiting to see if the mini pears, Margaret and are edible. We have some some mizuna as a winter crop as it is supposed to do well over winter

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  11. Gosh, wow, I'm really impressed with your harvest, Sue, especially the grapes. I'd love to have a grapevine but the only south facing wall in the gardens here is next to the railway line and I'd have to dig up paving slabs - or maybe grow one in a large pot. It does seem that the garden is responding to milder weather by carrying on a bit longer; fingers crossed no harm will come to your summer raspberry canes.

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    1. I'm pretty sure that I have seen one growing in pot, Caro

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  12. I noticed immature fruit on my raspberries too, it's certainly been a confusing year!
    What a IMPRESSIVE harvest, especially at this time of the year. I really do like your ox-eye daisy!xxx

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    1. I love arcs I daisies, Dina. They are just as beautiful as any cultivated variety.

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  13. Lovely and tasty grape, Sue! I'd love to grow some of vine but our climate doesn't permit to. These pears look like big one, it means the weather in your place is still warm enough for ripening.

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    1. The pair as will have to try ripening off the tree Nadezda It is rather bleak and miserable weather here.

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