Monday, September 28

We say tomarto

This week's harvest had been sparser than recent weeks partly as we haven't been to the plot much. We have been busy with non-gardening related activities and also were away for a couple of days. 

(Early warning of some bird photos for Wednesday. We spent one day at a falconry centre where Martyn and I took about 1600 photos and video between us. I promise not to post them all. Back to harvesting).
As you can see the beans are still producing and we are still harvesting some fruit. 
I don't always wait for the blueberries to be fully ripe before picking. As we don't visit the plot every day this isn't practical and the berries ripen as well off the bush. We have four bushes that produce fruit at slightly different times and interestingly the leaves of each bush are turning red in the same order as they fruit.
Last week was the time for calling it a day on the garden greenhouse tomatoes. As Martyn posted in the week all the tomatoes were removed and the plants disposed of.
Hopefully the green tomatoes will continue to ripen and be joined by a few more when the plot greenhouse gets the same treatment. We grew quite a few cherry sized tomatoes this year but we didn't turn our back on the big boys such as this Ananas (Pineapple tomato!) The plant didn't grow as well as the other varieties  but still managed to produce this.

It's our biggest this year but is a lone way off our record breaking monster video here, which was almost twice as big.

We don't have perennials taking space this winter and so we are trying to decide what we can grow in an unheated greenhouse over winter. Any suggestions?





34 comments:

  1. Wow, that's a huge tomato. Mine are still ripening on the vine, I picked another seven pounds yesterday. You could always start some spring onions off like I'm doing, it gives them a good start ready for next year.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. After reading your post, Jo spring onions are on the list of things to plant soon

      Delete
  2. I grew Ananas too, but mine were nowhere near as ribbed as that one you show. They were also the first ones to succumb to blight, though fortunately not before I had harvested a few fruit.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Some of ours rottled off, Mark I don't think they liked that cool or rather cold conditions.

      Delete
  3. Did you see last weeks Beechgrove Garden - they were planting up a polytunnel with over wintering crops.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. We did, S and D but they were growing things that would be mostly too big for the growing bags. I think we will grow more salad things than anything else.

      Delete
  4. That is an impressive tomato. I hope it tasted as good as it looks.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Really it was a bit bland, Daphne a bit of a disappointment.

      Delete
  5. Gosh, that is a giant of a tomato! Soup for the week from that bad boy. Do you ever make fried green tomatoes? They are quite delicious, and a good way to use up the green ones.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I haven't really ever used green tomatoes at all, Deborah, Usually we just leave them to ripen.

      Delete
  6. Do you need to net your blueberries Sue, or do you find the birds leave them alone? I ask because I inherited a couple of bushes that are currently in a fruit cage. But I need the space so am thinking of starting off new bushes elsewhere.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. We don't net our blueberries, Jessica butmaybe we are just lucky in that they are left alone. I know some people do have trouble with birds and blueberries.

      Delete
  7. Love that top photo and all the different shapes/colours/sizes of your tomartoes

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. We could do with less green though, Belinda.

      Delete
  8. Nice raspberries, Sue. Mine are eaten all now:(( And I also liked these yellow cherry tomatoes - I should grow them too.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. The yellow cherry tomatoes are lovely and sweet, Nadezda

      Delete
  9. Good lord, that's a serious tomato. I still have my plants up outside, I'm hoping they might do a little more ripening this week in the sun. I shall look forward to the falconry centre photos.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Tomato served three of us for tea last night, CJ

      Delete
  10. Oh my goodness....that tomato is a whopper! I had a few big ones but nothing like that! Looking forward to seeing those pics, don't skimp on them now!xxx

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. The smell cherry ones were far more tasty though, Dina

      Delete
  11. I see 'Ananas' failed badly in Aberdeen! Not enough sun.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. They didn't get much sun here either, Rick. The plants though weren't particularly fine specimens.

      Delete
  12. Lovely harvest, Sue! Your tomatoes and beans are really interesting and appetizing.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. The beans have done really well Endah

      Delete
  13. The vegetables are still productive! Wow! Such a huge tomato!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Things are beginning to wind down now, Malar

      Delete
  14. Fabulous harvest and so colourful to see . You are going to have quite a veritable banquet ! I m busy planning the next seasons harvest !

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Our thoughts are now more on next season too, Daisy. Debs

      Delete
  15. You may not have harvested as much as you normally do, but you still came home with a absolutely lovely assortment of veg. And wow that is one big tomato! And your record breaker - double wow - I bet that sandwich was amazing!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. The record breaker was the tastier of the two, Margaret

      Delete
  16. That's a tomato and a half! How about things like corn salad and pea shoots for overwinter in the greenhouse? There's claytona too, which reminds me I think I bought a pack of that.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks for the suggestions, Lou

      Delete
  17. You'd certainly get a lot of sandwiches from that one tomato! Very pretty harvest, I like growing different coloured beans too. FWIW I find growing salad leaves and oriental leaves in the greenhouse over winter works very well for me, gives me fresh greens for lunches and stir frys until the next year's outdoor crop start to be pickable.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I sewed various types of salad leaves in the greenhouse last week Janet

      Delete

Thank you for visiting and leaving a comment - it is great to hear from you and know that there are people out there actually reading what I write! Come back soon.
(By the way any comments just to promote a commercial site, or any comments not directly linked to the theme of my blog, will be deleted)
I am getting quite a lot of spam. It isnot published and is just deleted. I have stopped sifting through it and just delete any that ends up in my spam folder in one go so I am sorry if one of your messages is deleted accidentally.
Comments to posts over five days old are all moderated.