Saturday, July 25

Not according to plan

Back in May I wrote a series of posts entitled "Come into the garden". The aim was to give readers an idea of the layout of our garden so I drew a little plan.


Already the plan is out of date! Note the red cross on the now outdated plan - well something has changed here. 

If you read this post that Martyn wrote then you will have some idea of what I am referring to. If you are interested he has some 'before' photos and explanations how the bed was made.

We now have a mini pebble bed at the far side (from the house) of the pond. It's been dubbed mini pebble bed as we also have a larger version at the house end of the pond.
 From the bedroom window we can just catch a glimpse of the new bed.
And here is the view from the lawn.
It isn't fully planted up yet as we want to fill it with plants that we really like rather than just buying plants for the sake of filling the space.
The first plant that we bought was  Rhodoxis - Fairy Tale and earlier this week week we visited an alpine nursery and came away with:
Oxalis - Jay
Rhodohypoxis - Slack Top
Potentilla - Eriocarpa
Campanula -  Arvatica
Corydalis - Kingfisher
Rhodohypoxis - E A Bowles
Some of the plant labels specified free drainage was important so we added a bag of grit into the top layer of soil and also popped a layer of grit in the planting hole of the plants needing good drainage.

There are not many alpine type plants flowering at the moment and we would like to see the flowers before buying so we will be on the lookout for one or two more plants, when we visit nurseries over the next few weeks.

Any suggestions for what to look out for?


32 comments:

  1. I love your idea of waiting to buy plants to see them in bloom. I find myself getting caught up in the "fill it fast" mode and have made myself slow down and fill in things gradually. Though I'm often questioned about empty spots, this is a much better way to do it.
    LOVE the selection of plants you got. It is going to be a wonderful new garden.....

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    1. We've had to curb our instincts to buy plants that will just do, Sue. Often it is a disappointment later.

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  2. That Rhodoxis is so pretty. I'd never heard of it before. I looked it up and it gets way too cold here for it.

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    1. Neither had I, Daphne I thought it was a rhodohypoxis until I read the label more carefully

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  3. Maybe you could try Condopsis or Eucomis. Both grow in alpine climate and the only ones I'm sure will bloom in August. Also there's a site alpinegardensociety.net that has a huge base of plants where you'll be able to find plants that bloom in summer. You could always go with safe choice and plant gazania. They like it cold, mine died as soon as the temperature reached 30°C

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    1. I have a gazania in another border Leanan and it would be too large. The bed is very small and so I need very small plants for it,

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  4. The best laid plans and all that ~~~ but regardless, it all looks beautiful to me and I wish mine looked half as good! At present, I am on a two year 'watch and see what does well' as our micro climate is all awry. I like your use of the log roll, I'd never have thought to use it that way.

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    1. We have the boards of log edging around nearby borders, Debbie and wanted to match but didn't want straight edges.

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  5. The alpine garden at RHS Wisley (sadly not conveniently near you for a quick visit) has alpines in flower most of the year - often with the miniature alpine versions of 'common' seasonal plants and shrubs (such as pinks, hebe, bulbs etc etc). It's eye-opening to see how many familiar plants have a very attractive, tiny alpine version.

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    1. I do have spring bulbs in mind, SandD. I did think about tiny pinks and phlox but thought pinks needed alkaline soil. The other plants that I have bought prefer something slightly acidic.

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  6. Alpines are no my forte, Sue, so I have no suggestions. Seems like you have made a good start already though. (P.S. - Alpine strawberry? You can get ones with different coloured flowers, I know.)

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    1. I think they do, Mark but I think we will stick to having alpine strawberries just on the plot. :)

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  7. It's a lovely idea I hope it does well for you x

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  8. It all looks great Sue. Wise to wait for plants you are going to like than plant for planting's sake. A mistake I often make. I was given a wee pot of seedlings of Allium cyathophorum v. farreri a couple of years back and this year they flowered for the first time. They are pretty wee things growing to about 8 inches in height. They would like that situation you have there Sue.

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    1. I will look them up, Angie thank you

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  9. I remember your original plan. I asked you how you made it with the intention of doing one myself. I expect I will find the time only this winter.
    It looks very good.

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    1. I look forward to seeing your plan of your garden, Alain

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  10. What a lovely new bed, and a great idea to fill it slowly with things you really like. I shall look forward to seeing it take shape.

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    1. Now it is just a matter of the nurseries having things that I like, CJ. Sorry that should say things that WE like.

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  11. Looks great, nicer than the pots which used to stand here and gives you much more scope for planting.

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    1. The pots were just a stop gap really Jayne it was just a matter of deciding what to do.

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  12. That's a wonderful addition to the garden - I did read Martyn's post & am impressed by your thoroughness in preparing the bed; that's probably why your garden does so well. I'm much lazier & avoid digging whenever possible, especially in our rocky soil - whenever I have a grassy area to deal with, I get out the old cardboard & either lay soil (in the case of raised beds) or mulch on top of it.

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    1. It wasn't a real dig, Margaret as we didn't want to disrupt the pond sides, more just a loosening of the base of the bed to jelp with drainage. We don't do much digging in the garden as most of it is made up of permanent beds.

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  13. What a nice idea - I love alpines beautiful flowers in miniature - a nice addition to your garden.

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    1. I have a soft spot for alpines too, Elaine

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  14. I don't know much about alpine plants but I've heard more and more people talking about them. I have a few plants and would like to branch out in this area as well. I like what you've done in your alpine section so far; looks really good.

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    1. Maybe as they build houses with smaller gardens, KellI alpine plants will become more popular.

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  15. How lovely! I do love rock/pebble areas, they always contain so many little jewels!xxxx

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    1. I hope I can find some more little jewels to complete the picture, Dina.

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  16. Lovely garden! Beautiful blooms too!

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