Monday, May 18

Red and Green

We have kept pulling a few sticks of rhubarb regularly for a few weeks now. So far the harvests have come from our early cropping varieties - Timperley Early and an unknown variety.

Last week we pulled the first sticks of  a later variety - Crimson Grooveless. As its name suggests, this variety produces much redder stems. 

The red sticks also retain their colour after cooking.


Compare the colour of stewed Crimson Grooveless above with that of stewed Timperley Early below.


I have intended growing pea shoot for a while now and eventually got round to it this year. The first lot of seeds sown were transported away by what I suspect were mice, so a defence strategy was required when I resowed some seeds.


A propagator lid was placed on top of the small troughs in which the peas were sown. Then as an extra level of security, just in case the mice could nudge the lid aside, a heavy  object- in mouse terms - was placed on top.


Our defences held and we are now harvesting the shoots. Having found that we like them I've sown more seeds.

Can anyone tell me whether the plants from which the shoots have been harvested will grow more shoots in the same way as a sweet pea bushes out when the tips are removed? Is this just wishful thinking?

We are also harvesting baby salad leaves from the greenhouse.



More baby leaves, radish and spring onions have been sown in our Woodblocx raised bed and some young lettuce plants have joined them. Martyn has made a cover to protect them from any would be salad nibblers. The frame may look very high for salads but this way we can just lift up one side of the mesh to plant without removing the protection completely.

The aim is to have a succession of fresh salad ingredients close to hand in the garden so we can have a salad when we fancy it rather than having to remember to bring salady ingredients from the plot and store them for use later.

If this works and we have enough space we may have to invest in a second raised bed.


Copyright: Original post from Our Plot at Green Lane Allotments http://glallotments.blogspot.co.uk/ author S Garrett

30 comments:

  1. The red stewed rhubarb looks much more appetising that the other one but I bet they both taste just as delicious.

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    1. The red one does have the edge in terms of looks, Jo but both taste good

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  2. Pea shoots do bush out after picking to make more shoots.

    Agree with Jo above - the red colour of that cooked rhubarb is fanatastic. Shall have to seek some out.

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  3. That is quite the difference with the cooked rhubarb! So do they taste the same? Sometimes I actually find that the less attractive version of a veg ends up tasting better. My question about the peas would be - can you harvest pea shoots and then let the plants grow to produce actual peas?

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    1. I guess that they would go on to produce peas Margaret. I can't think why they wouldn't. In a blind tasting I don't think you would pick our which rhubarb was which but the eyes probably would rate the pink one as the nicest,

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  4. Your lettuce looks wonderful! I have the same question about the pea shoots so will check back later and see if anyone knows.

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    1. Hi Susie consensus seems to be that the peas will the reshooting will produce less tasty leaves.

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  5. Yes, you can usually get two or three pickings as long as you leave enough for the shoots to come from...two to three inches high. They are good aren't they!!

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  6. The red rhubarb does, I agree, look far tastier. Those pesky mice have a lot to answer for. Glad you found a method to keep them away from your pea shoots. The cage looks very robust, hopefully no salad nibblers are strong enough to hoist it up :)

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    1. So many pesky things about aren't there Angie

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  7. Lovely red rhubarb, I haven't heard of that variety before. I read somewhere that peas do grow a second crop of shoots, but I've found they aren't nearly as good as the first lot so I don't bother with them now, I just re-sow. Delicious aren't they.

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    1. I have sown a second batch of peas CJ,

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  8. Pea shoots, I've never heard of them before.....do you just eat the first leaves?
    The rhubarb looks delicious, especially the red one one! You can't beat having fresh salad close to the house, I've been harvesting spinach for quite a while now.xxx

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    1. It;s our first year of growing pea shoots, Dina and they taste just like peas :) Maybe no surprise there.

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  9. Your vegetables look great !
    Greetings

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  10. I like the pea shoot defences Sue. Maybe you could put up a threatening notice as well for the meece's attention. I prefer salad leaves to be at home too where I can go out on slug patrol.

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    1. I have some more seeds under protection now Anna so maybe I'll male a little sign. bit in case they can't read I'll draw a mousetrap and a skull and crossbones.

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  11. Your rhubarb looks great. I prefer the colour of Timperley early. The colour reminds me of apricot jam colour...and I loove apricots :D
    This is the 4th year I'm thinking of growing rhubarb and again I didn't do it. Maybe next year.

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    1. I think that we have just two apricots that have set in our little tree Leanan. Make next year the year of the rhubarb.

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  12. Wow, I love the look of the Crimson Grooveless.

    Much more pleasing on the eye! Although you can not beat the taste of home grown rhubarb, no matter what the variety!

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  13. Hope the second batch of peas grow well! I have faced this problem before with mice! Lovely harvest of rhubarb and salads!

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    1. They are a nuisance in the greenhouse and steal a few things Malar

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  14. I really wish I had a more red rhubarb. The green tastes good, but just doesn't have the eye appeal.

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    1. The red is an appetising colour Daphne,

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  15. I like the "salad-protection box". Such things are becoming more-or-less necessary. Without them our veg production would be very much reduced.

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    1. Most things needs protecting these days, Mark

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