Wednesday, March 11

Male Reed Bunting st RSPB Old Moor



22 comments:

  1. Lovely photos, he's such a pretty, dainty little thing.

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    1. It is, CJ. Where it is on 'tip toes' it was being spooked by a noisy camera in the hide.

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  2. He looks like an inquisitive little chap. I'm not familiar with reed buntings but I think I'd recognise one now that I've seen your photos.

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    1. As I replied to CJ a noisy camera was spooking him. The female has no black markings.

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  3. I would have mistakenly said that was some sort of Sparrow! I wonder if they have then around Fleet Pond, because there are certainly lots of reeds there.

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    1. Lots of little brown birds (especially females)are mistaken for sparrows Mark

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  4. They do look exactly like the things I thought were sparrows.

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    1. Easily done Patsy especially from a distance,

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  5. Beautiful bird, we had a female chick in the rescue last year, it was released which was great, they are such interesting little birds.xxx

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    1. In some ways I envy you getting up close to the animals, Dina but not when I see the injuries you deal with.

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  6. Replies
    1. They are Jessica, There are three different individuals in the photos and were more but no femalesm

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  7. Great shots Sue - lovely little bird. ~We had a yellowhammer in the garden the other day - the first one we've seen for years.

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    1. Thanks Elaine - the yellowhammers weren't co-operative
      like this one

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  8. Our buntings (at least the two that I am familiar with) look very different from yours. One is the snow bunting which only visit in winter and the indigo bunting, probably our most exotic looking bird.

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    1. Snow buntings do occur in the UK Alain being more widespread in winter, They are resident in the far north east of Scotland. I'd never heard of an indigo bunting so looked them up and it really is a striking bird.

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  9. Great photos Sue.. he's a lovely looking bird :o)

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    1. Thank you Julie, some were in transition into full male breeding plumage when the head and chest is a very pronounced black.

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