Tuesday, February 3

They don't have to be long and green

Last year we grew four varieties of courgettes Atena Polka - yellow, Sunbeam - yellow striped, Tondo Chiaro di Nizza - Pale green and spherical and Zucchini - dark green.

The seeds were sown under the indoor grow light on 28 April. In both 2013 and last year the seeds took 6 days to germinate after which time they were moved into the garden greenhouse. After about four days in the greenhouse the seedlings were potted on into individual pots.
The courgette plants were planted out on 31 May which was about a fortnight earlier than in 2013.


As with many other crops the courgettes were planted through weed control fabric.
If asked earlier, I would have said that the harvest was lower than in previous years, however on checking the records for 2013 I found that the 2013 harvest was 47.96kg. Therefore, this year's and last year's harvests were very similar. The 2014 harvest started about two weeks earlier than in 2013 which was consistent with the earlier planting but we finished harvesting much earlier probably because we became less efficient at picking the fruits produced and so fruit production ended prematurely early.
Yellow varieties always seem less prolific and we only really grew two yellow varieties as one packet of seeds - Sunbeam - was a freebie.

This year we will just be growing the three other varieties Atena Polka F1, Tondo Chiaro di Nizza and Zucchini



27 comments:

  1. I'm not bothering with yellow courgettes, as you say, they're less prolific than the green ones. I was only going to grow long green ones until Mick told me he prefers the round ones when I make stuffed courgette so I'll give him what he wants.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. The round ones are good for stuffing, Jo and I like the yellows raw in salad. You are spoiling Mick

      Delete
  2. Not sure what we are getting this year as they are coming as baby plants. Last year I only grew patty pan squash which were extremely prolific they were yellow too. If I had the space I would grow some more. I'm hoping for a mixture of yellow & green, fingers crossed.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. We've never grown Patty Pan, Jo just the large autumn squash. Do they taste the same?

      Delete
  3. The though of having to deal with 49kgs of Courgettes is mind-boggling! I don't mind the occasional one, but that quantity would last me about a decade...

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. We do give lots away and it freezes to use for pasta sauce and we chop it up in salads, Mark

      Delete
    2. I'm with mark. 100 pounds of zucchini is an awful lot. Though I wouldn't mind more than I've been getting. Last year it was only 18 pounds. 50 would be nice. Then I could give a lot away.

      Delete
    3. We do give quite a lot away, Daphne The trouble is that if we planted less what's the betting they would all die?

      Delete
  4. In the past, I've also not been impressed with yellow courgettes, but last season a generous fellow allotmenter (or is is allotmentee ?) gave me a 'Gold Rush' yellow courgette plant to try - it was the first to produce (and last to finish in November without cover !) and tasted very good. As you've said before, every season and every plant is different, perhaps it was so good because it was a gift.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. The yellow ones are tasty SandD I think I prefer the yellow when eating courgettes raw.

      Delete
  5. I love the yellow ones, I always try and grow them. I'm a big fan of tromboncino as well, a climbing one which has an odd shape, but it's really prolific and the fruits are really crisp and lovely. I can highly recommend it if you're ever looking to grow more than your existing 50kg! Incidentally, you are my first port of call for courgette recipes.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Is that the summer squash that us eaten as a courgette CJ? Glad that the recipes are useful.

      Delete
    2. I didn't realise, but yes, apparently it is. The flesh is really nice, slightly more dense than a courgette maybe. And they grown REALLY fast!

      Delete
  6. The choice is simple : "Defender" every time - most resistant to Mozaic Virus Disease.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Oh no, Mal. Mosaic virus that isn't just something else I should worry about is it?

      Delete
  7. I grew a yellow one called Buttercup Yellow which was very nice (the vegetable varieties seem completely different between the UK and North America). I get the impression that yellow ones don't get huge as fast as the green ones. I should watch them more carefully this summer to see if this is indeed the case.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I wonder whether they are the same varieties with different names or completely different varieties, Alain

      Delete
  8. I have never grown the yellow ones, what do they taste like? Courgettes certainly love to grow in Britain don't they?xxx

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. They are not vastly different to the green, Dina jus a subtle difference.

      Delete
  9. Lovely harvest! They look so fresh! Yellow variety is new to me too!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. We like the yellow varieties, Malar

      Delete
  10. All looks so fresh... So, I want to try to grow it once more. I have never successed on growing courgette-zucchini. How does the taste?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I'm not sure how you would describe the taste Endah - anyone help here? My best effort is that the taste is quite muld and really takes flavour from seasonings and other ingredients cooked with it.

      Delete
  11. I was reading your post wondering what on earth two people do with nearly 50kg of courgette? Your comments reveal you give a lot of it away so I have to ask, why bother growing it if you're not going to use it yourself?

    Yes, some plants might not make it but how many years have you actually lost all your courgette plants to accident or disease?

    To Endah's question - they don't taste of very much at all. Perhaps think of them as a vegetable version of cucumber? At less than 20 calories per 100g they have a very low nutritional value. In truth, I don't really think they are worth the time and soil space. I would rather grow something absolutely delicious :}

    ReplyDelete
  12. We do use quite a few Jayne and pop them in all sorts of dishes and we have lost plants fairly often, Also we have the space so sob'r forfeit growing anything else for its sake, We freeze some and it is good to be able to give some things away, Weight is deceptive as sometimes they can grow quite large and are used as a marrow and stuffed. When they are grated and squeezed for using in a cake or burger the actual useable weight decreases considerably

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I've just had a really silly idea - apparently the flowers are lovely when deep fried (never tried it!) but that way you'd get ground cover from the plants without the bother of 50kg of produce. Can you tell I don't really like courgettes {{grin}}

      Delete
    2. One gite we stayed at in France the owner grew courgettes just to hatrvst the flowers so no t so daft, Jayne. I did somehow pick up that you weren't afgan :)

      Delete

Thank you for visiting and leaving a comment - it is great to hear from you and know that there are people out there actually reading what I write! Come back soon.
(By the way any comments just to promote a commercial site, or any comments not directly linked to the theme of my blog, will be deleted)
I am getting quite a lot of spam. It isnot published and is just deleted. I have stopped sifting through it and just delete any that ends up in my spam folder in one go so I am sorry if one of your messages is deleted accidentally.
Comments to posts over five days old are all moderated.