Wednesday, February 4

A winter's plot



 

39 comments:

  1. It's all looking very neat and well under control. I really need to spend some time at mine, but it's just too cold at the moment, yesterday the ground didn't thaw out at all. Didn't stop me ordering some seeds though, apricot chillies, totem and sakura tomatoes and the yellow courgette that Spade and Dagger recommended on your post yesterday (Gold Rush).

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    1. Fingers crossed it does well for you too.

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    2. We haven't really done anything over winter CJ other than gather veg. The weed control helps.

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  2. There's still plenty of interest around though, even at this time of year.

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    1. You just have to look harder, Jo

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  3. Love seeing your plot photos, I was admiring the buds on my trees this morning.

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    1. Let's hope the fruit trees perform this year, Jo

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  4. I'm jealous of those Leeks - about twice as big as any of mine!

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    1. I've concluded over the years that the size of leeks depends on having a very open plot, as well as the usual care given and the variety. My plot (like your raised beds, Mark ?) can be a bit on the shady side and my supposedly 'giant' leeks of any variety are never that enormous.

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    2. We usually do well with the leeks, Mark. Just hope he allium pests keep their distance. Last year they were in a spot that was fairly shaded in winter SandD but I guess that they had plenty of light when they were young. They do need a really long growing season but we defy convention and don't top and tail them

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    3. Sue - Hope you continue to evade the leek pests. For last 2 seasons we've grown our leeks under environmesh because of the leek moth, which is a real problem now in the South East. I think the mesh cuts out quite a bit of light too - we should have got the light-weight mesh instead of the more rigid stuff which blocks out more light but is easier to put over a frame & peg down.

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    4. From what I hear allium leaf miner has reached the Midlands, Soon everything will need to ne under some sort of protection, Do you have to cover onions too?

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    5. At the moment, onions generally mature & fall over before the leek/onion moths/pests really get going here, but this could change ! Just about everything that was previously low maintenance (leeks, carrots etc), has to be netted, meshed or fleeced now to get a reasonable crop and it makes weeding more of a fiddle. Because there is always a challenge to growing on an allotment, it's root rot that gets my onions as it's always been in my soil and there's no cure. I only grow a few early shallots now, so I really hope that leeks don't start to succumb to that one.

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    6. That's where our use if weed control fabric helps, Could you grow onions in a raised bed with new soil brought in?

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    7. Sue - It's a good idea and I'm sure it would work, although as my plot is at the far end of the site off the main route way it's not a task for the fainthearted. Maybe a project for next season !!

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  5. Very encouraging, it looks all ready to roar away with the Spring! I dislike doing much in my garden in warm periods of winter because I don't want to disturb the hibernating insects but it is very tempting some days:) Yours looks in fine fettle.

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    1. We've done our fair share of hibernating too, sweffling

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  6. Your photos said it all without a word! Your garden is lovely right now; well kept up and ready for spring, which is just around the corner.

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    1. Maybe we need to keep telling ourselves that, Juliet as the weather forecasters keep telling us that we are in for bad weather.

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  7. Could do with some of those leeks for Tattie and Leek soup!
    Looks great and you've had a very bright day Sue. Ground still frozen solid here!

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    1. Funny that you should say that, Angie as I was thinking of making just that. Have you a favourite recipe?

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  8. Wonderful looking leeks! It's good to see everything looking so healthy, despite this cold snap, and how cheering to see the buds! I've noticed them everywhere....it won't be long now!xxx

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    1. The buds do make me feel optimistic, Dina

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  9. Looks good sue. Is that a green manure under your fruit trees? I'm treating my weeds as a bit of a green manure, leaving them over winter as ground cover, and will clear them when the beds are needed.

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    1. Under the fruit trees is self sown candytuft, Lou. I'm hoping for a colourful display,

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  10. Just think of all the leek and potato soup you can make.

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    1. I'd be able to open a soup kitchen, Elaine.

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  11. This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.

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    1. I don't know what happened to your comments Endah so I have found it and copied it back - sorry.

      Endah I always jealous everytime I see your leeks! So lush...

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    2. Leeks are always good to have at this time of year,

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  12. What lovely leeks. And so fat. It makes me wish I had gotten some from the store. I haven't grown them in years though.

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    1. They seem to do well for us Daphne, We've used about half of our crop and now need to go dig up more.

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  13. Plot looking fab in the bleak month of Feb. Admiring your lush green paths.

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    1. We like the grass paths Karen in spite of the extra work involved mowing and trimming

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  14. Oh I must get some more weed control fabric pronto Sue! Your plot looks so neat and tidy. Can you recommend any online sources? It's interesting to see how sites differ. Yours looks very open whilst on my site there are fences between each plot and a high galvanised mesh perimeter fence. The latter does not add any beauty but is a useful ready made frame for climbers.

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    1. We usually check for the cheapest on ebay or Amazon. Anna, Some places don't have the width we want,But don't get the thinner stuff we get the 100gms

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