Monday, November 10

Owt for Nowt - Lavender

We have lavender hedging around a couple of our fruit beds.
I can't remember how many lavenders I actually bought originally - no more than six and maybe less. They originally lived in the garden. When I was trimming one of the plants I noticed lots of seed flying out and so (as you do) I decided to sow some and as a result ended up with quite a lot of baby plants that found their way to the plot.
Taken in 2005
Over the following years I took cuttings and increased the stock and decided to create the lavender hedge but at the time only had enough plants to plant up two edges of each bed.

A couple of years ago I took some hardwood cuttings and planted another third side of one of the beds.
The other fruit bed didn't really have space for more lavender until we replanted it this year. (Please ignore the coltsfoot that has now been dealt with).
So I needed more lavender and was going to take some hardwood cuttings until I watched Monty Don on Gardeners' World taking cuttings from softwood. This was something I could do right away rather than forgetting at some later date.

I took everything that I needed to the plot with me including the propagator tray. I wanted to give the cuttings the best chance of success so didn't want them to dry out.
4 July 2014
In just over a month some cuttings were starting to grow and roots were coming out of the bottom of some pots. These cuttings were potted up and the others left until they too showed signs of having 'taken'.
12 August 2014
All the cuttings have now been planted up and placed in a coldframe to overwinter. I Have nipped out the tips of the cuttings and some have already grown into healthy little plants.
7 October 2014
I took 36 cuttings and now have 30 baby lavenders. That is certainly in keeping with the Yorkshire saying "Owt for Nowt" (Translation "Something or anything for nothing")


30 comments:

  1. 30 plants from 36 cuttings is an excellent rate. I love love love lavender, so a plot edged with it is my idea of heaven. I took some cuttings from a white lavender earlier in the years, and I'm hoping they've taken.

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  2. I haven't done any this year but have taken cuttings of Bowles Mauve Erysimum and Pinks which have all taken. Such a satisfying way of increasing your stock.

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    1. It is Elaine, I took some pink cuttings this year too.

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  3. I love lavender. I have just two plants though as I don't have a lot of space in the yard. Of course any plant that smells good always gets a thumbs up from me.

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    1. I love scented plants too Daphne

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  4. If my one and only lavender survives the winter wet I shall try this. Although perhaps it's not too late for hardwood cuttings now?

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    1. The softwood cuttings take quicker, Jessica,

      Not sure whether it is too late for hardwood cuttings but what;s to lose?

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  5. 30 out of 36, well done Sue. I wish I had got to grips with this cuttings malarkey earlier in the year. I'd have given more a go. Still, there's always next year.
    Your cuttings look great and it will be nice to see them on the plot next year.

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    1. Just hope they come through winter , Angie,

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  6. I love lavender ! Thank you for this interesting information about this wonderful plant !
    Greetings

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  7. I love taking cuttings, though I missed the boat on the lavendar front this year, too distracted by the ASHP installation and too much work!

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    1. Gardeners' mantra, Janet, There's always next year,

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  8. How easy to propagate lavender, I did not know Sue. I would do the same instead of to buy new lavender in a garden center. But .. how to store the rooted cuttings during frost winter?

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    1. Fingers crossed that they over winter successfully in the greenhouse, Nadezda,

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  9. I love Lavender but it doesn't grow very easily here and so I only have6 plants that I keep alive (just) in the polytunnel for summer cut flowers.
    TBH I never thought of taking cuttings or saving seed - I can't imagine why!!
    You've given me something to think about though Sue :) I'm under strict instructions to stay away from all things gardening at the mo as I did my back in again a couple of weeks ago and hubby doesn't want me to risk further injury as we go on holiday in 10 days BUT guess what I'll be doing when I get back :) I'm going to try cuttings and if I manage to get some success then I'll be more willing to try various varieties outside as the new plants won't cost me anything.
    Hopefully I could have a Lavender hedge as lovely as yours one day :)

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    1. Hope that your back improves, Linda and that you enjoy your holiday, Not the best time too rake cuttings yet anyway

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  10. This is the easiest way I have seen to take cuttings from lavender...I may do this myself next year.

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    1. Have a go, Tanya your bees will love it,

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  11. I don't often buy plants, but when I do, one of the factors influencing my choice is the plant's potential for further propagation. Like you, I have had some success with Lavender cuttings, but also with Rosemary, and my favourite shrub - the Dogwood.

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    1. The trouble is that very often you end up with more plants than you know aht to do with Mark which is why we ended uo with a row of buddleia on the plot,

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  12. What a marvelous result! I have taken lots of lavender cuttings too, they take so easy! The bees will be grateful, I love your lavender hedges.xxx

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    1. They are easy, Dina, very satisfying

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  13. I am not sure I would call them hardwood, but I have rooted longish shoots of lavender at this time of the year in pots in my unheated greenhouse They take perhaps six months and don't all succeed.
    Have you tried french lavender from seed?. It is generally not hardy but I do find the odd self sown seedling rather surprisingly overwinters and if self collected seed is sown in the greenhouse, well the sky's the limit!

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    1. I haven't tried French lavender from seed Roger but I doubt it would survive conditions on the plot. The seed was gathered from our plants,

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  14. Now that's most thrifty Sue. I don't know if my eyes are deceiving me but it looks like you have some different varieties there. Do you make lavender bags or use the lavender in any other way?

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    1. We do have plants that seem to grow differently and have different coloured flowers., Anna but they all came from seed collected from one plant so maybe they don;y come true. I have made lavender bags in the past and sometimes pick a few stems for a vase but haven't used any in cooking.

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  15. Great plan to have a lavender edge - if I had an allotment I'd want one too. Although I'm not particularly keen on its scent, I do love to see the bees feed on it. Love you've shared the staged images of taking your cuttings :-)

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    1. The butterflies and bees definitely love it Shirley. It will need anoither clip in spring

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