Friday, November 14

Magnolia watch

It may not be obvious from the photo below but since my last magnolia post the magnolia tree has undergone surgery and the canopy has been reduced somewhat.
Branches were clawing at the bedroom window and the canopy was spreading wider than we wanted and in danger of extending the shade beyond those plants that could tolerate it. A second operation may be required next year but for now we felt that the tree had suffered enough.

As other trees in the garden had either completely shed their leaves or were displaying shades of red and yellow, the magnolia was resolutely remaining fully clothed and green.

Then suddenly it all changed.
Green turned to yellow and the leaves started to fall revealing patches of daylight through the once dense canopy.
The leaves quickly lose their temporary autumn colouring and become dry and brown. 
As the leaves turned paler they also seemed to become thinner. The tree also lost leaves quicker on the side that is battered by winds whistling between the houses.
Leaves that fall onto the garden beneath will be left to rot away naturally as nature intended. The plants there are happy growing amongst leaf litter and the birds and other wildlife enjoy foraging amongst the dry leaves and shelter over winter.

You can see from the photo below that there is still evidence of leaf fall from previous years.


23 comments:

  1. It's a lovely tree, I haven't the space for one but there is a one in a neighbours garden which always makes me smile when I pass.

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    1. It;s great how we can share the delights of someone else's plants too, Jo

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  2. I'm agree. This is a lovely tree, especially when the flowers are blooming. I can't wait to see that.

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    1. There will be quite a wait now, Endah

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  3. I love to see the magnolias in bloom...one might make a nice addition to the hedgerow on the bee plot. What do you think??

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    1. It's not really a hedgerow type of tree, Tanya and a bit expensive to plant on an allotment. and they are quite small to start with - this one is 30+ years old,Also I don't think bees would find it particularly attractive.

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    2. Bees do love magnolia Sue, although the magnolia does not produce nectar it produces plenty of pollen which the bees use for food. Because I have never grown one I didn't know they were expensive. Never mind...there are plenty within flying distance of their hives for them to feast on.

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    3. Is that all types of magnolias, Tanya? I've never noticed lots of activity around ours. Maybe the flowers are too high up fir us to have noticed.

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  4. It has been lovely following this wonderful specimen, it really is a beauty. Glad the pruning went well. I can't seem to get them to grow here.xxx

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    1. Martyn has plans for more pruning next year Dina. I think I'll choose another tree next year bit am torn between a quince and a medlar,

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    2. I would find both/either of them fascinating!xxx

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  5. It's a magnificent tree, even after its pruning. I love the cyclamen foliage as well, so pretty.

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    1. I love cyclamen leaves too CJ which is just as well as they pop up everywhere

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  6. My magnolia (cultivar Dr. Merrill) did the same thing -- leaves waiting to the last minute to turn yellow and drop almost overnight. But what a blaze of yellow they were!
    Ray

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    1. Hi Swimray and welcome. I haven;t heard of Dr Merrill so I Googled it and it is lovely. The remaining leaves are really yellowing now, Often strong winds strip the leaves at this stage too

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  7. No wonder you have so many birds visiting your garden, it's a wildlife haven, even down to the leaf litter. They do enjoy having a rummage to see what they can find amongst fallen leaves. I love the cyclamen foliage, it's beautifully marked.

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    1. They love the side of the house, Jo. It's a tiny (very tiny) woodland edge feel. Bushes to hide in and a couple of tree to perch and hop around in, leaves to rummage in, bird bath and feeders. The birds sit on a morning waiting for Martyn to fill the feeders, We also have Fields nearby (unfortunately diminishing and becoming building sites) and mature trees,

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  8. I like the newly sculpted shape, it makes a wonderful silhouette. And branches scratching at the window is horrid.

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    1. We call it our giant bonsai, Janet. It wasn't just the branches scratching either - we were woken each morning by blue or great tits tapping at the window. I tried for ages to film them but didn't manage it,

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  9. It's a great tree especially when it blooms !
    Greetings

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  10. It’s nice to see your magnolia is responding well to pruning, I will have to prune mine too in years to come, although not for a few years yet I think. Did yours bleed when you cut into it?

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    1. Just hope it doesn't sulk and refuse to flower next year, Helene. No bleeding.

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