Friday, September 12

September in the Garden Greenhouse

Since your last peep inside out garden greenhouse things have changed quite a lot.

Let's start with a quick look from the doorway. Firstly to the right ...
.. and then the left.
You may remember that just inside the door to the left was a shelf full of cyclamen grown from seed. Now it looks like this.
The cyclamen coum and a few if what I call indoor cyclamen have been potted up. More about the rest in a moment. The lily will hopefully survive winter and flower again next.  I think I'll pop it into a bigger pot. The jacaranda has developed a list due to outgrowing the height of the shelf it was on. Hopefully it will straighten but anyone know what I need to do with it over winter.

Now looking down the left hand side we have ...
... mainly pots of aubergines. The variety - Jackpot - don't make large plants - which suits us - but after what seemed a slow start, are now producing lots of fruit. You may just spot one sweet pepper nestling amongst the aubergines.

The untidy trailing plant is a cucamelon. This is in the dock at the moment and the jury is out waiting for a character witness to support its bid to avoid being composted.

Looking down to the floor level ...



... the only way to deal with all the cyclamen that I ended up with was to pop them in large tub. A couple have gone into the porch and the ones in pots on the shelf will become house plants. These are not all the plants as I took a tray to my sisters. In the photo above the tub on the left are grown from seed collected from my own plants. At the moment these are much better than the newly bought Latinia seed raised plants on the left.

Next we come to the apricot and nectarine trees that have been moved into the greenhouse to try and avoid peach leaf curl. They will soon be joined by the peach tree.



The ipomoea still hasn't flowered! On the shelf are some of the remaining autumn onions that have kept us well supplied and will some make way for the summer ones that are drying in the plot greenhouse.

On the potting bench at the far end are our sweet peppers.



The varieties are King of the North, Orange Bell and an unknown variety gifted by a friend. These have produced out best crop of peppers ever. The onions are more autumn grown ones.

Now to the right of the greenhouse we have the tomatoes.


These have produced a steady supply unlike the plot greenhouse ones which this year, in an about turn, have been rubbish. Even Sioux which was a total failure in this greenhouse last year has produced a crop.

Back in the corner towards the door.


The younger of the two figs has shot up and is just about as big as its older cousin but has long fingered leaves. I'm not sure that this will produce any fruit as it was grown from by a friend from seed taken from a shop bought fig!

Then looking up we have the grapevine.


I'm guessing next month things will look far less productive.

34 comments:

  1. You've been very successful with the cyclamen, they should give you a lovely show when they all flower. Your tomatoes are looking very lush still, so different to mine as I've now removed all the leaves to allow the fruit to ripen.

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    1. I'm hoping they do well. Jo but I didn't expect to have so many. I've added the link to the guest post I mentioned after you had commented/

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  2. Your list of greenhouse plants is about as comprehensive as a Seed Merchant's catalogue! I remember that when we lived in Malaya when I was young, we had a huge Jacaranda tree in our garden, and it used to have masses of blue flowers. It was a BIG tree, so be careful where you plant yours... What do you think of King of the North? My one and only plant has remained very small and has produced about eight small peppers which have been much more pointed in shape than I had expected.

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    1. King or the North has done well for us, Mark They have been in the greenhouse rather than outside though.and the fruits aren't pointy just usual bell shape.

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  3. Goodness it is all looking very lush & healthy. We moved our peach tree out of the greenhouse during the summer but it will be moved back in shortly due to peach curl disease. How does your Apricot tree do? I'm thinking of investing in a dwarf one.

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    1. The apricot flowered really early, JO and set about six fruits which fell off later. I didn't suffer from peach leaf curl though

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  4. Really impressed with your cyclamen success. I am going to have to try growing from seed, it looks like a brilliant way to bump up the numbers!

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  5. I really must get some cyclamen seed, I've been meaning to ever since you first posted about your experiences of growing them. You have a wonderfully productive greenhouse still, my cucamelons didn't even make it to being plants large enough to flirt with the compost bin. Not sure about trying again next year, space is at a premium, I think I may opt out of that particular experiment.

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    1. We have the room bit don't think cucamelons will feature next year, Janet

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  6. Those grapes looks so good. It makes me think I should be growing them.

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  7. this might help Sue http://www.botanicalgarden.ubc.ca/forums/showthread.php?t=47068 lovely post thank you for sharing

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  8. As always I enjoyed seeing what is going on in your greenhouse. Wow....just look at all those grapes! Your peppers are ahead of mine, mine are only just beginning to turn red.
    A friend sent me some jacaranda seeds, the trees are beautiful when in flower, has yours flowered yet, be interesting to know how to care for them if they ever grow. I read your guest post and enjoyed it, I couldn't work out how to leave a comment being the old technophobe I am!xxx

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    1. No flowers yet , Snowbird - I'm wondering how hardy it is, We cut off the whole top earlier in the year and thought it was dead but it came again!

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  9. Gorgeous! You must love going in there.

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    1. Not when it is blowing a gale and the glass us rattling, tpals

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  10. I read your flower post, it was great. I couldn't work out how to comment on it, but I really enjoyed it. There's so much productivity in your greenhouse. Do you find the elephant garlic has a different flavour to the normal kind? I grew it for the first time this year (you were right when you said it was slower to start, but it got there in the end). I'm not quite sure what I think of it at the moment.

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    1. Elephant garlic is supposedly milder, CJ but my palate is educated enough to notice a difference,

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  11. The cucamelonn is so interesting! How about the taste? I habe never seen here.

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    1. They taste vaguely of cucmber, Endah.

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  12. I really love to see your garden greenhouse, Sue. Thanks for sharing, :)

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    1. Welcome Yang - glad you enjoyed reading

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  13. Mmm, I can almost smell that greenhouse. It looks fascinating ! Our apricot has spent ages in the greenhouse avoiding leaf curl, it is finally outside - briefly, before moving back in. Are the cyclamens easy to grow from seed ? If so, I might have a go, as they look so good. You have so much in there, and it is all so productive. Fantastic peppers ! I will pop across to read your guest blog on sarah Ravens site ...

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    1. I found the cyclamens surprisingly easy, Jane. The seeds need soaking for 12 hours before sowing. I sowed early under our indoor grow lights in a spare bedroom and got 100% germination.

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  14. The cucamelon is obviously the same thing as the mouse melon I grew for the first time this year. I find it is OK but it is more a curiosity than a staple. I doubt I will grow it again, although the cucumber taste is fine. What do you think of it?

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    1. It is the same thing, Alain and I agree entirely with your assessment. Just one to tick off the list of things to try!

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  15. Looks fantastic. The grapes are amazing looks like you'll have a great harvest.

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    1. The grapes are pretty reliable Damo.

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  16. With the grapes you could be living in Italy! They look amazing and seem so healthy.

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    1. We have some grapes on the plot, Kelli but after the cold August I doubt that they will be edible.

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  17. Wow sue… now that’s an impressive working greenhouse! What amount of work must be involved in taking care of plants in your greenhouse and down at the plot. I’m wondering how you divide the tasks :-)

    Great images with labels too btw – you have to be inspiring others to grow food plants! You’ve inspired me once again to think about growing cyclamen from seed :-D

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    1. Have a go at cyclamen Shirley

      Dividing tasks? Martyns is the machinery man and tends to be in charge of watering etc, but in most things we just do what is needed although we do have our own project like my cyclamen and Martyn tends to look after the tomatoes and prune the grapevine as it is too high for mini me. I so the vines on the plot though.

      I guess it would be interesting to record who does what.- for us not you!

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