Monday, September 15

Nutty Harvest

8 September
A regular plot task at the moment is to pick cobnuts. I have two methods, first I pick any clusters which easily part from the bush but this leaves some clusters that are too high to reach and so I shake the branches and collect any clusters that fall to the ground. The harvest is then spread out to dry wherever I can find space and the nuts drop out of the dried husks. We haven't tried any yet so I am hoping that they taste good.

The autumn raspberries and alpine strawberries keep coming. In the past we have picked alpine strawberries into November until the frosts blacken the centres of the flowers.
10 September
After each plot visit, which last week amounted to every other day, we come away with handfuls, (or at times bucketfuls), of sweet peas. Last year I bought a collection of named varieties selected for scent. Although many have long stems, one variety in particular has very short stems and small flowers so next year I may choose a collection of varieties selected for cutting on the grounds that if most have good scent, we are hardly likely to notice if one or two varieties are less perfumed.
12 September

32 comments:

  1. I don't have a lot of space, but you inspire me to try many things. I have thought for some time to put in a line of native hedging {much to the chagrin of neighbours with neatly manicured gardens} and seeing your nuts gives me the go ahead!
    I'd also like to share with you that I avoided the dreaded carrot fly this year by sowing seeds in an old, clean dustbin! Only one bin this year as a trial, next year I will go all out as the carrots I've harvested are SO GOOD, plus growing in bins frees up the ground for other things in my limited patch.

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    1. You need to choose an eating variety Deborah - ours is a Kent Cob. You can't beat home grown carrots can you?

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  2. Well, those Cobnuts look good - and ripe too. You got to them before the squirrels then!

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    1. Still more to pick, Mark so the squirrels may get lucky.

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  3. I don't know anything about cobnuts, they look like hazelnuts. Are the nuts encased in a shell in the same way? I shall pop over to have a read of your guest post now.

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    1. I looked this up and it seems cobnuts are a type of hazelnut, Jo

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  4. I used to grow cobnuts years ago. I loved them and you have now reminded me that I would rather like to grow them again. I shall be adding them to my bare-root plant shopping list, but not before I read your guest post.

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  5. Great harvest, Sue! Your berries and sweet peas make me so jealous. Anyway, the cobnuts look so interesting. I have never seen before. The nut looks like Melinjo (Gnemon gnetum), that grown on the low land here.

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    1. The shell is broken open to access the kernel which is the part eaten, Endah

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  6. Fabulous harvest & just look at those sweet peas. I struggled with mine this year unfortunately.

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    1. It's a full time job picking them, Jo

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  7. Lovely harvests. I especially love your fruit. I really miss having fruit this week. Well I have it but had to get it from the market. And that is a huge mass of sweet pea blossoms. Your house must smell wonderful.

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    1. The smell is wonderful Daphne and you have had some wonderful fruit,

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  8. My sweet peas are just about on their last legs now but they have been amazing this year. I have a couple of hazel trees but they are quite young - how long will I have to wait before they produce nuts?

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    1. We got ours in January 2011 See this post, Elaine. It was planted out in May 2011 See this post and this year is the first real nut year. It's a Kent cob - I don't know whether varieties mature differently

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  9. Your harvest looks amazing, beautiful fruits. Congrats on doing the article for Sarah Raven, I'll have to go have a look now.

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  10. I'm amazed how long your sweet peas have flowered, I do like them in the house yet mine went over ages ago! How lovely to still have such a bountiful harvest and berries.
    Cob nuts.....I have never tried them are they hazel nuts? xxx

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    1. From what I've read, Dina a cobnut is a type of hazelnut

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  11. Wonderful harvest. I'm especially envious of the calabrese, cabbage and cobnuts. Are the things next to the raspberries your alpine strawberries? You have a really good amount of them. I tried growing some but they were so small and pretty tasteless, not at all like the ones I have seen other people grow. They spread like weeds as well, I can't get rid of them now! The sweet peas are still looking beautiful, especially with that sprig of variegated mint. Mine have very short stems and greenfly - not great for picking.

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    1. Yes, alpine strawberries are in the top photo, CJ WE have lots of plants as edging but they don't spread just the odd self seedling. Which variety is yours?

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  12. The cobnuts look great, they're larger than my hazels. Bet you can't wait to try them!

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  13. So much bounty - loving all of the fruit. But it's those sweet peas I can't get over - just gorgeous!

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    1. Thanks Margaret - I hope to pick more today

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  14. What a lovely Harvest Sue your sweet peas look lovely I never got round to growing any this year but will try and just popping over to read your guest post have a good week

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    1. Hope you have yout own sweet peas nest year, Linda

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  15. Marvellous harvest! Looks just fantastic!
    Here we are now starting to sow our summer veggies - no planting yet, as there is still a danger of frost. But it's wonderful to see our fruit trees flowering, the berries are shooting, the days are getting longer...and the air is full of promise.
    So, seeing your pictures, I am feeling even more excited! Thanks, Sue! :)
    And one day I'll sow sweet peas, too. You may just have inspired me to make an effort. :)

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    1. Hope that you have a good year VG

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  16. My sweet peas were all finished weeks ago but were lovely while they lasted. I'm also on the lookout for longer stemmed varieties - if you have to pick them, you want them to look good in a vase! Mine were covered in greenfly though - I was constantly picking off greenfly indoors! Brilliant idea to keep big supermarket boxes and plastic trays for collecting produce in - especially the amounts that you're harvesting!

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    1. Our sweet pea plants are beginning to get mildew Caro so I guess the end is in sight.

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