Friday, June 6

Strawberries - next year

As I explained in my last post our strawberry bed is coming to the end of its productive period so we need to think about starting a new bed next year. The old bed will be left in place whist ever it is giving us a crop and also until the new bed starts to deliver.

We could grow new plants from runners off the existing plants but we want to reassess the varieties and also feel we need to start with new stock. I don't think the weakened plants will make good parents. So we have two main decisions to make - which varieties shall we grow and where shall we put them?

Last year our strawberries cropped as follows.

Marshmarvel the early variety didn't crop any earlier than Marshmello and produced a very mediocre crop. This variety will not be on next year's list.
Marshmarvel
Marshmello has always produced a good crop so we may decide to grow this variety again.
Marshmello
Amelia the late variety produced a good crop and extended the fruiting season a little so may be on our list for next year.
Amelia
As for Flamenco it does have a long cropping season but overall the total harvest was poor.
Flamenco
So although we are undecided on exactly which varieties we won't be growing either an early or perpetual type. 

The next decision is where to grow? The large rectangular bed made netting and picking difficult so we are going to plant on one of our long narrow beds.



This set up will mean that we can reach the fruits without standing on the beds. We will also be able to grow the plants through weed control fabric instead of laying strips as an afterthought. We also intend to make a series of mini cages which can be removed easily when picking.

So do you have a must have variety of strawberry as we are open to suggestions.  
Copyright: Original post from Our Plot at Green Lane Allotments http://glallotments.blogspot.co.uk/ author S Garrett

20 comments:

  1. They look so inviting I suppose you consider three years as the optimum before replacement needed

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    1. I think it varies David but most of these are flagging now.

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  2. I'm going to watch this with interest. My Strawberry-growing expertise is slim, so I need all the help I can get. There seem to hundreds of varieties available these days, and if you listen to the suppliers they are all "The Best Ever". Word-of-mouth recommendation from someone you trust is a different thing!

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    1. That's the problem, Mark everyone sells the best ever strawberry but we have found Marshmello to ne a good one.

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  3. A great lesson on growing fruit. So many variety that I have never heard before. Thank for sharing.

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    1. I think there are different varieties available in different countries, Endah

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  4. The Amelia looks delicious! Like Mark, it will be interesting to see how your new strawberry patch does. Love your plot!

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    1. Thank you Julie, Amelia was a good one but took longer to start fruiting well which is maybe why the plants are not as worn out.

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  5. This year my strawberry crop is so far quite poor. The plants I have have been growing on the bed for 3 years now - and I think they're a bit worn out. After I've read your post - I'm considering to make a new strawberry and wild strawberry bed next year.

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    1. I think that would be a good idea, Dewberry.

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  6. It's great that you're able to make an informed decision about this. I seem to have hundreds of strawberry plants and am quite envious of your being able to plant through membrane. Slugs seem to get most of my strawberries so I'm tempted to rip them all out! (Although, of course, I won't.)

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    1. Don't forget to leave the nibbled ones on the plant, Caro

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  7. I am following your strawberry advice attentively, I need to sort my bed out next year. Isn't it wonderful how I can just let you do all the hard work and I can swoop in and take all the tips....lol xxx

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    1. I guess it will be autumn when we buy the plants, Snowbird. In he past we have then grown them on in pots before planting.

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  8. My strawberry bed was done for last year. I didn't order new berries and now I seeded it with annuals. My goal is to replant this fall. We will see. I like your research.

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    1. Thank you Bonnie - I bet those annuals will look great. I'm trying for an annual bed this year.

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  9. Very interesting will be keeping an eye on your progress. My strawberry plants should have been thrown away a long time ago. I picked up half a dozen Elsanta at a local plant sale which are still in pots. I need to get a bed dedicated to them ready for next year.

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    1. Do you recommend Elsanta, Damo?

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  10. Teh berries look so juicy! Hoep you find a good plot for them! ;)

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    1. We have a spot sorted, Malar.

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