Wednesday, September 4

Just for the bees, (and other creatures)



20 comments:

  1. They are amazing photos Sue!!!!!! What camera do you use?

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    1. Anna These were taken with a Panasonic Lumix FZ100.

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    2. Oh, I have one of those!! They are good cameras and your shots certainly are good!

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    3. We've just invested in a new Lumix FZ200 as the 100 is getting a bit tired. The main reason for the upgrade is that it has a even better telephoto lens which hopefully will be good when visiting the RSPB reserves. The wide angle is supposed to be even wider too. Time will tell what the photos are like.

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  2. The flowers are certainly being enjoyed by the wildlife. They're a gorgeous colour.

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    1. They are, Jo even though some are laid flat to the ground

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  3. So you don't eat them then? I always think they are not sufficiently nice to eat to warrant all the palaver of preparng them for the kitchen, but they certainly do look nice.

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    1. They're cardoons, Mark. If you eat anything of it you blanch the young stems. The flowers are smaller than those of an artichoke. See this post

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  4. Great pictures Sue - whilst my garden would probably be considered too small to grow these beauties, I wouldn't be without!
    Loved by all pollinators and extremely useful this late in the season.

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    1. It is a monster plant isn't it, Angie. But smaller gardens need dramatic statements too.

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  5. Oh ....marvelous! What on earth is that little flat looking beetle, thingy?xxxx

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    1. The flat looking beetle thingy is a shield bug, Snowbird. I met my first when I felt something tickling my neck and brushed one off onto the bathroom floor. Being me my first reaction was to go for my camera! I've actually noticed lots since.

      The species are difficult to identify as they change according to their age - I think this is the last stage before it becomes an adult.

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  6. Lovely pictures Sue it`s not the camera that`s important it`s the grey matter sitting about 30cm behind it

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    1. Thank you David. It's a pity the camera didn'r pick up the gold coloir the shone from the last seed head. It was amazing

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  7. Love the photos, especially the ones with the bees on the flower heads.

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    1. The bees are always there Sharon no matter what they love those flowers.

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  8. Wonderful flowers. I have some artichokes that are flowering at the moment, and they are similarly dramatic.

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    1. Artichoke flowers are bigger CJ. We have one that is struggling at the moment. The plant isn't as tall but what it lacks in height it makes up in flower size. I bet yours is covered in bees too.

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