Saturday, August 10

Who in their right mind plants potatoes in June?

If you look for information on when to plant potatoes it is likely that you will be told that you should plant seed potatoes from March to early April with some sources suggesting that you may get away with a planting up until the end of May.

This year we had a selection of seed potatoes that had been languishing in the greenhouse as we couldn't decide whether to plant them and if so where to plant them.

When a suitable bed (part of a bed really) became available in mid June we contemplated planting these remaining sets. If the suggested 14 week growth period (for earlies) was accurate and blight didn't kill the tops then we decided we may just manage a crop of some sort by the end of September. So the remaining seed potatoes - Nadine and Nicola were planted on 16 June.

At the moment the tops are probably equally the strongest growth of all the potatoes planted this year and are certainl y producing more flowers than any other potatoes have.
So will we get a crop from them? We won't know the answer to this until we dig the plants up but we have maybe been lucky with the weather so far. 

Gardening isn't a text book activity and it is always worth having a go at things which shouldn't in theory work. The key questions are what do I have to lose if I do 'x' and it doesn't work? Then what have I got to gain if I do 'x' and it comes off. 

If you can afford the space and the cost of planting is minimal, or as in our case nil, then have a go and prove the experts wrong!

28 comments:

  1. The foliage is certainly lush. I expect they'll grow better than those planted earlier because of the warmer conditions, though it's a case of hoping that blight doesn't stike when they're in the ground later. I'm sure you'll get some sort of crop anyway.

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    1. Blight is the main concern, Jo

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  2. They certainly look amazing. I'm guessing they will be pretty good when you dig them up.

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    1. Just be good to get some sort of crop, CJ

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  3. It's worth waiting, even if you don't get any potatoes from these plants - you'll get the knowledge that planting them in mid June is too late.
    But, in my opinion you'll get some potatoes, maybe they don't grow very big, but new potatoes - why not?

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  4. I must admit that I put mine in way to late however the foliage looks very well and they are flowering, so I'm also hoping they are fine. Our garden centre is selling potatoes to harvest on Christmas Day. We did this last year and from an August planting we had roast spuds for Christmas dinner!

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    1. We are thinking maybe the end of September, Chel

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  5. I'm a great believer in giving things a go - you won't have lost much even if you don't get a great crop.

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    1. Me too, Elaine As they say nothing ventured nothing gained

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  6. My bet is you will get some tasty potatoes Sue! After all who needs to garden to a strict calendar regime..!!

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    1. Who Indeed, Jill? Would we have been thrown off your site? :{

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  7. I think it's always trying something new, and by the look of those spuds I'd put my money on a harvest.xxxx

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    1. I hope your money is safe, Snowbird!

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  8. Not an exact science is a true statement, the plants look fine, nothing ventured nothing gained.

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    1. There's as many expert opinions as 'expert' gardeners, Rooko so we're ploughing our own furrow!

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  9. How unorthodox! There's nothing like a little bit of rule-bending - especially when the weather is so good and you never know, if we get a great autumn, this could be a huge success. I can't wait to learn the results!

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    1. We like to play differently, Crystal and maybe this year the weather has helped us rebel against convention

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  10. I did the same with some onions that were sitting on Pound Stretchers shelf for 59p,they weren't soft so the first week of July they went in and I have some really decent size onions coming already. My theory was we usually have a decent September so here's hoping

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    1. We plant our left over sets late Flowerlady and very close together. We end up with smallish useful onions.

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  11. I have often planted stuff late and got great crops from it...maybe later than some but just think how jealous all your plot neighbours will be when you are digging up fresh new potatoes in September...think I might give this a go next year!!

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    1. Let's hope so Tanya - I guess it is always down to how the weather fares,

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  12. They will do well. I often do some in a bin for later cropping, they are usually the size of salad pots, but the tip for them is to cut off the flowers, you don't want any of the energy going into making seeds (which they do).

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    1. Salad size potatoes will be fine, Liz

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  13. Sounds like a good experiment, hope you get a good crop, whatever the size!

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    1. And rthere was nothing to lose, Janet.

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  14. How interesting, look forward to seeing the results :}

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    1. So do I Bilbo. Have to say the plants look to be the healthiest and strongest of the lot. But is that reflected beneath ground?

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