Friday, July 5

Here's to a successful partnership.

My last post described the plight of the female kiwi living on the plot.

About three years ago we acquired another kiwi. This one was a miniature form called Issai. It now seems to be often referred to as a kiwi berry. This variety produces small, smooth-skinned fruits. After the problems with our other kiwis, the attraction of this one is that it is self fertile so only one plant is needed.

We decided to plant Issai in a large pot and it has started each year well, but so far fruit have eluded us. The fruit has set and then the plant has started to look sickly. So sickly that in its first year we thought it was dying. The problem is that it is a favourite 'prey' plant for red spider mite which due to our lack of vigilance has devastated the plant each year and caused it to abort any idea of fruiting.
This year I am determined to watch for the little blighters and once they arrive take immediate action. I try to avoid using a spray but sometimes needs must so I researched a spray with which I could target the spider mites without harming any other creatures or the environment. I've ended up with one that uses rapeseed oil and forearmed I am now keeping a close eye on the plant ready to stem any attack.
The plant is covered in flower at the moment.
Each isn't as showy as those of its bigger cousin and the leaves are less decorative but if these flowers produced fruit I will be happy.
The spider mite usually seem to attack after fruit has set so I'll be ready this year.

10 comments:

  1. Good luck with it. It's so annoying how there's so many pests just waiting to attack.

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    1. Isn't it just, Jo. The weather conspires against us then if plants survive that there are the bugs and diseases.

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  2. The blossom is lovely - fingers crossed that it sets and the beastly critters keep away - there's always something waiting to pounce.

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    1. I'm on watch for them, Elaine.

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  3. What pretty blossom! I do hope it becomes fruit and you win out over the beasties!xxxx

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    1. So do I Snowbird - I'll be here as back-up

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  4. Well I have only had my Issai foe a year and i thought it had died but I was glad to find it making a comeback this year. With all this in mind I will gladly use the experience you have had with yours to hopefully one day have a healthy plant producing fruit!!

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    1. Just watch out for those spider mites, Tanya. They may be tiny but they have a devastating effect.

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    2. I will definitely be keeping an eye out though we don't suffer with them to much around here...don't know why.

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    3. We've only noticed the spider mite on this and the fig. I read they like hot and dry conditions bu we had them last year outside too!

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